Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Authors' reply
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Authors' reply
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Authors' reply
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Peter O'Halloran raises a good point about this study: it was underpowered. Even slightly higher levels of suicidal thinking among people who are screened for suicide risk would be clinically important and our study was only powered to detect a fairly large difference.

However, at the start of the study we faced a dilemma; a sizeable minority of local general practitioners told us that they were uncomfortable asking people with depression about suicidal thoughts because they were concerned that this could ‘make them feel suicidal’. 1 Subsequent discussions with medical students and trainee psychiatrists (and indeed members of the ethics committee that reviewed the study protocol) revealed that these concerns were shared by others. A sample size calculation based on a non-inferiority hypothesis and using a smaller but still clinically important difference in levels of suicidal thinking would have required a sample size several times larger than the one we recruited. As Norman and colleagues have recently pointed out, 2 sample size calculations are usually a compromise between statistical considerations, economics and logistical constraints. When we embarked on the study we knew that we did not have the resources to recruit a sample large enough to detect a small difference in levels of suicidal thinking among those who were and were not screened. However, we hoped that we could rule out the possibility of a large difference and this is therefore what we set out to do. The 95% confidence intervals around the odds ratio for the likelihood of suicidal thoughts among those that were screened were broad (0.66–1.18) and are compatible with either higher or lower levels of suicidal thinking in those who are screened compared with those who are not. Despite this limitation, these are the first data that test the veracity of a belief that was held by many and may have been an obstacle to screening for risk of self-harm in this high-risk group.

As we pointed out in the Discussion of our paper, it was not possible to collect data needed to calculate relative risks associated with screening because this would have meant collecting baseline levels of suicidal ideation from all those in the study. This would have exposed those in the control arm of the study to the very factor that the study was designed to examine.

1 Bajaj, P Borreani, E Ghosh, P Methuen, C Patel, M Crawford, MJ. Screening for suicidal thoughts in primary care: the views of patients and general practitioners. Ment Health Fam Med 2008; 4: 229–35.
2 Norman, G Monterio, S Salama, S. Sample size calculations: should the emperor's clothes be off the peg or made to measure? BMJ 2012; 345: e5278.