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Clusters of Obsessive-Compulsive Phenomena in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Sumant Khanna*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore 560029, India
V. G. Kaliaperumal
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, NIMHANS
S. M. Channabasavanna
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, NIMHANS
*
Correspondence

Abstract

Clusters of phenomena were obtained by two clustering techniques, using the form and content of obsessions and compulsions. Significant clusters which emerged involved washing, checking, thoughts of past, and embarrassing behaviour. Depression occurred as a discrete cluster. Eighty-nine per cent of subjects could be fitted into at least one cluster; over half could be fitted into only one cluster. Washers and checkers made up more than half of the sample studied.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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