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[18F]FDG PET Study in Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

A Clinical/Metabolic Correlation Study after Treatment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Daniela Perani*
Affiliation:
Istituto di Neuroscienze e Bioimmagini CNR
Cristina Colombo
Affiliation:
Istituto Scientifico H San Raffaele
Sergio Bressi
Affiliation:
Istituto Scientifico H San Raffaele
Annamaria Bonfanti
Affiliation:
Istituto Scientifico H San Raffaele
Franco Grassi
Affiliation:
Istituto Scientifico H San Raffaele
Silvio Scarone
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Milano
Laura Bellodi
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Milano
Enrico Smeraldi
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Milano
Ferruccio Fazio
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Milano
*
Dr Daniela Perani, Istituto di Neuroscienze and Bioimmagini CNR. c/o H San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy

Abstract

Background

We used [18F]FDG and PET in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) to evaluate cerebral metabolic involvement before and after treatment with serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors.

Method

In 11 untreated, drug-free adults, regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) was compared with that of 15 age-matched normal controls.

Results

rCMRglu values were significantly increased in the cingulate cortex, thalamus and pallidum/putamen complex. After treatment a significant improvement in obsessive–compulsive symptoms on the Y-BOC scale (t = 3.59, P < 0.01) was associated with a significant bilateral decrease of metabolism in the whole cingulate cortex (P < 0.001). Clinical and metabolic data were significantly intercorrelated (Kendall's τ = 0.65; P < 0.01).

Conclusions

These findings indicate that OCD is associated with functional hyperactivity of a selected neuronal network and that treatment to reduce symptoms may have a selective neuromodulatory effect on cingulate cortex.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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