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Validation of an FFQ to assess short-term antioxidant intake against 30 d food records and plasma biomarkers

  • Meng Yang (a1), Ying Wang (a1), Catherine G Davis (a1), Sang Gil Lee (a1), Maria Luz Fernandez (a1), Sung I Koo (a1), Eunyoung Cho (a2), Won O Song (a3) and Ock K Chun (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To validate a brief FFQ developed for capturing short-term antioxidant intake in a sample of US college students.

Design

A seventy-four-item antioxidant FFQ was developed based on major antioxidant sources in the American diet. The FFQ was validated against 30 d food records (FR) and plasma antioxidant concentrations. The reliability of the FFQ was evaluated by two FFQ administered at a 1-month interval.

Settings

University of Connecticut, CT, USA.

Subjects

Sixty healthy college students.

Results

Estimates of dietary antioxidants from the FFQ were moderately to highly correlated with those estimated from the 30 d FR (r = 0·29–0·80; P < 0·05) except for γ-tocopherol and β-cryptoxanthin. Total antioxidant capacity from diet only or from diet and supplements estimated by the 30 d FR and FFQ were highly correlated (r = 0·67 and 0·71, respectively; P < 0·0001). The FFQ categorized 91 % of participants into the same or adjacent tertiles of antioxidant intake as the 30 d FR. Most dietary carotenoids estimated from the FFQ were correlated with plasma levels (P < 0·05). Correlation coefficients for test–retest reliability ranged from 0·39 to 0·86. More than 94 % of the participants were classified in the same or adjacent tertiles between the two administrations of the FFQ.

Conclusions

The brief FFQ demonstrated reasonable validity for capturing a comprehensive antioxidant intake profile. This FFQ is applicable in epidemiological or clinical studies to capture short-term antioxidant intake or to simply document the variations of antioxidant intake in intervention trials. Cross-validation studies are warranted in other target populations.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email ock.chun@uconn.edu

References

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Keywords

Validation of an FFQ to assess short-term antioxidant intake against 30 d food records and plasma biomarkers

  • Meng Yang (a1), Ying Wang (a1), Catherine G Davis (a1), Sang Gil Lee (a1), Maria Luz Fernandez (a1), Sung I Koo (a1), Eunyoung Cho (a2), Won O Song (a3) and Ock K Chun (a1)...

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