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Trends in types of protein in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010

  • Hyunju Kim (a1) (a2) (a3), Casey M Rebholz (a2) (a4), Laura E Caulfield (a1), Rebecca Ramsing (a3) and Keeve E Nachman (a5) (a6) (a7)...

Abstract

Objective

To delineate trends in types of protein in US adults from 1999 to 2010, we examined the mean intake of beef, pork, lamb or goat, chicken, turkey, fish, dairy, eggs, legumes, and nuts and seeds (grams per kilogram of body weight) among adults and according to subgroups, including chronic disease status.

Design

Six cycles of the repeated cross-sectional surveys.

Setting

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999 to 2010.

Participants

US adults aged ≥20 years (n 29 145, range: 4252–5762 per cycle).

Results

Overall, mean chicken (0·47 to 0·52 g/kg), turkey (0·09 to 0·13 g/kg), fish (0·21 to 0·27 g/kg) and legume (0·21 to 0·26 g/kg) intake increased, whereas dairy decreased (3·56 to 3·22 g/kg) in US adults (P <0·03). Beef, lamb or goat intake did not change in adults or among those with a chronic disease. Over time, beef intake declined less, and lamb or goat intake increased more, for those of lower socio-economic status compared with those of higher socio-economic status.

Conclusions

Despite recommendations to reduce red meat, beef, lamb or goat intake did not change in adults, among those with a chronic disease or with lower socio-economic status.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email knachman@jhu.edu

References

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Trends in types of protein in US adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010

  • Hyunju Kim (a1) (a2) (a3), Casey M Rebholz (a2) (a4), Laura E Caulfield (a1), Rebecca Ramsing (a3) and Keeve E Nachman (a5) (a6) (a7)...

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