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Trends in dietary fat and fatty acid intakes and related food sources among Chinese adults: a longitudinal study from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (1997–2011)

  • Xin Shen (a1), Aiping Fang (a2), Jingjing He (a1), Ziqi Liu (a1), Meihan Guo (a1), Rong Gao (a1) and Keji Li (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

Few studies have evaluated the intake trends of fatty acids in China. The present study aimed to describe the profile of longitudinal dietary fat and fatty acid intakes and their related food sources in Chinese adults.

Design

A longitudinal study using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (1997–2011) was conducted. Dietary intake was estimated using 24 h recalls combined with a food inventory for three consecutive days. Linear mixed models were used to calculate the adjusted mean intake values.

Setting

Urban and rural communities in nine provinces (autonomous regions), China.

Subjects

Adults (n 19 475; 9420 men and 10 055 women).

Results

Fat intake among men in 1997 was 73·4 g/d (28·1 % of total energy (%TE)), while in 2011 it increased to 86·3 g/d (33·2 %TE). Similarly, for women, this intake increased from 62·7 g/d (28·4 %TE) in 1997 to 74·1 g/d (33·7 %TE) in 2011. Energy intake from SFA grew from 6·8 to 7·6 %TE for both sexes. PUFA intake increased from 18·4 to 22·5 g/d for men and from 15·7 to 19·7 g/d for women, and was above 6 %TE in all survey periods. Intakes of 18:2 and 18:3 fatty acids showed significant upward trends in both sexes. Participants consumed less animal fats and more vegetable oils, with more PUFA intake and less energy from SFA. EPA and DHA intakes fluctuated around 20 mg/d.

Conclusions

Fatty acid intakes and profile in Chinese adults are different from those reported in other countries.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email kejili@bjmu.edu.cn

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Keywords

Trends in dietary fat and fatty acid intakes and related food sources among Chinese adults: a longitudinal study from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (1997–2011)

  • Xin Shen (a1), Aiping Fang (a2), Jingjing He (a1), Ziqi Liu (a1), Meihan Guo (a1), Rong Gao (a1) and Keji Li (a1)...

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