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Soft drinks: time trends and correlates in twenty-four European countries. A cross-national study using the DAFNE (Data Food Networking) databank

  • Androniki Naska (a1), Vasiliki Bountziouka (a1) (a2), Antonia Trichopoulou (a1) (a2) and the DAFNE Participants

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate time trends in the availability of soft drinks, to identify food choices associated with their consumption and to assess the relationship between socio-economic status and daily soft drink availability in a wide range of European countries.

Design

Data on food and beverage availability collected through the national household budget surveys and harmonized in the DAFNE (Data Food Networking) project were used. Averages and variability of soft drink availability were estimated and tests for time trends were performed. The daily availability of food groups which appear to be correlated with that of soft drinks was further estimated. Multivariate logistic and linear regression models were applied to evaluate the association between socio-economic status and the acquisition of soft drinks.

Setting

Twenty-four European countries.

Subjects

Nationally representative samples of households.

Results

The availability of soft drinks is steadily and significantly increasing. Households in West and North Europe reported higher daily availability of soft drinks in comparison to other European regions. Soft drinks were also found to be correlated with lower availability of plant foods and milk and higher availability of meat and sugar products. Lower socio-economic status was associated with more frequent and higher availability of soft drinks in the household.

Conclusions

Data collected in national samples of twenty-four European countries showed disparities in soft drink availability among socio-economic strata and European regions. The correlation of soft drinks with unfavourable dietary choices has public health implications, particularly among children and adolescents.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email antonia@nut.uoa.gr

Footnotes

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See Appendix for full list of DAFNE Participants.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Soft drinks: time trends and correlates in twenty-four European countries. A cross-national study using the DAFNE (Data Food Networking) databank

  • Androniki Naska (a1), Vasiliki Bountziouka (a1) (a2), Antonia Trichopoulou (a1) (a2) and the DAFNE Participants

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