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Relative validity and reproducibility of an FFQ to determine nutrient intakes of New Zealand toddlers aged 12–24 months

  • Emily O Watson (a1), Anne-Louise M Heath (a1), Rachael W Taylor (a2), Virginia C Mills (a1), Ashleigh C Barris (a1) and Paula ML Skidmore (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

The study objective was to determine the relative validity and reproducibility of a modified FFQ for ranking the nutrient intakes of New Zealand toddlers aged 12–24 months.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Setting

Dunedin, New Zealand.

Subjects

One hundred and fifty-two participants completed a ninety-five-item FFQ twice, and five days of weighed diet recording (WDR), over one month. Validity and reproducibility were assessed for crude data and for data that were weighted for total fruit and vegetable intake (FV-adjusted).

Results

De-attenuated correlations between FV-adjusted FFQ data and WDR data ranged from 0·45 (Zn) to 0·77 (Ca). The percentage classified to the correct WDR quartile by the FV-adjusted FFQ data ranged from 34·6 % (total fat, Zn) to 50·3 % (Fe). Average gross misclassification was 3 %. Bland–Altman statistics showed crude data had a range of 128–178 % agreement with the WDR and mean FV-adjusted intakes had 112–160 % agreement. FV-adjusted intra-class correlations, assessing reproducibility, ranged from 0·65 (vitamin C) to 0·75 (Ca).

Conclusions

The Eating Assessment in Toddlers (EAT) FFQ showed acceptable to good relative validity, and good reproducibility, for ranking participants’ nutrient intake and is able to identify toddlers at extremes of the nutrient intake distribution. It will be a useful tool for investigating toddlers’ nutrient intakes in studies that require a method of dietary assessment with low respondent burden.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email anne-louise.heath@otago.ac.nz

References

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