Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6f8dk Total loading time: 0.492 Render date: 2021-03-06T05:05:20.447Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The principles, definition and dimensions of the new nutrition science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

Christopher Beauman
Affiliation:
European Bank of Reconstruction and Development, London, UK
Geoffrey Cannon
Affiliation:
World Health Policy Forum
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition, University of Vienna, Austria
Peter Glasauer
Affiliation:
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy
Ingrid Hoffmann
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany
Markus Keller
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany
Michael Krawinkel
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany
Tim Lang
Affiliation:
Department of Food Policy, City University, London, UK
Claus Leitzmann
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany
Bernd Lötsch
Affiliation:
Museum of Natural History, Vienna, Austria
Barrie M Margetts
Affiliation:
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, UK
Anthony J McMichael
Affiliation:
Institute of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Canberra, Australia
Klaus Meyer-Abich
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Essen, Germany
Ulrich Oltersdorf
Affiliation:
Federal Research Centre for Nutrition and Food, Karlsruhe, Germany
Massimo Pettoello-Mantovani
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Nutrition, University of Foggia, Italy; also World Health Policy Forum
Joan Sabaté
Affiliation:
School of Public Health, University of Loma Linda, CA, USA
Prakash Shetty
Affiliation:
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy
Marco Sória
Affiliation:
Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy
Uwe Spiekermann
Affiliation:
Institute of Economic and Social History, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany
Colin Tudge
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, London School of Economics, London, UK
Hester H Vorster
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Nutrition, North-West University(Potchefstroom campus), South Africa
Mark Wahlqvist
Affiliation:
Asia Pacific Health and Nutrition Centre, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Mariuccia Zerilli-Marimò
Affiliation:
World Health Policy Forum
Corresponding
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Objective

To specify the principles, definition and dimensions of the new nutrition science.

Purpose

To identify nutrition, with its application in food and nutrition policy, as a science with great width and breadth of vision and scope, in order that it can fully contribute to the preservation, maintenance, development and sustenance of life on Earth.

Method

A brief overview shows that current conventional nutrition is defined as a biological science, although its governing and guiding principles are implicit only, and no generally agreed definition is evident. Following are agreements on the principles, definition and dimensions of the new nutrition science, made by the authors as participants at a workshop on this theme held on 5–8 April 2005 at the Schloss Rauischholzhausen, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany.

Result

Nutrition science as here specified will retain its current [classical] identity as a biological science, within a broader and integrated conceptual framework, and will also be confirmed as a social and environmental science. As such it will be concerned with personal and population health, and with planetary health – the welfare and future of the whole physical and living world of which humans are a part.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2005

References

1Lewin, K. Principles of Topological Psychology. New York: McGraw Hill, 1936. See also http//:www.psy.vu.nl/kli/info/htm/CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2Garrow, J, James, WPT, Ralph, A, eds. Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 10th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2001.Google Scholar
3Bowman, B, Russell, R. Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 8th ed. Washington, DC: ILSI Press, 2001.Google Scholar
4New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, Clarendon Press, 1993.Google Scholar
5Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (UK). Manual of Nutrition, 4th ed. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1955.Google Scholar
6Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (UK). Manual of Nutrition 10th edition, 5th impression. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1995.Google Scholar
7Cannon, G. The rise and fall of dietetics and of nutrition science 4000 BCE–2000 CE. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 701–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8Mottram, V, Graham, G, eds. Hutchison's Food and the Principles of Dietetics, 9th ed. London: Edward Arnold, 1944.Google Scholar
9Mottram, V, Graham, G, eds. Hutchison's Food and the Principles of Dietetics 10th ed. London: Edward Arnold, 1956.Google Scholar
10Young, VR. A vision of the nutritional sciences in the third millennium. In: Elmadfa, I, Anklam, E, König, J eds. Modern Aspects of Nutrition. Basel: Karger, 2003: 24–9.Google Scholar
11Trayhurn, P. Obesity: what role for nutritional science?. British Journal of Nutrition 2005; 93(1): 12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
14Cannon, G, Leitzmann, C. The new nutrition science. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 673–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15McMichael, AJ. Integrating nutrition with ecology: balancing the health of humans and biosphere. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 706–15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16Tudge, C. Feeding people is easy: but we have to rethink the world from first principles. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 716–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17Popkin, B. Using research on the obesity pandemic as a guide to a unified vision of nutrition. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 724–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18Lang, T. Food control or food democracy? Re-engaging nutrition with society and the environment. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 2005; 730–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
19Meyer-Abich, KM. Human health in nature – towards a holistic philosophy of nutrition. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 738–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
20Beaudry, M, Delisle, H. Public('s) nutrition. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 743–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21Pettoello-Mantovani, M. The social and environmental aspects of nutrition science. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 749–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22Leitzmann, C. Wholesome nutrition: a suitable diet for the new nutrition science project. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 753–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
23Vorster, HH, Margetts, BM, Venter, CS, Wissing, MP. Integrated nutrition science: from theory to practice in South Africa. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 760–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
24Wahlqvist, ML. The new nutrition science: sustainability and development. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 766–72.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25Uauy, R. Defining and addressing the nutritional needs of populations. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 773–80.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
26Leitzmann, C, Cannon, G. Dimensions, domains and principles of the new nutrition science. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 787–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
27The Giessen Declaration, Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 783–6.Google Scholar
28McMichael, A. Disease patterns in human biohistory [Chapter 1]. In: Human Frontiers, Environments and Disease. Past Patterns, Uncertain Futures. Cambridge: University Press 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 47
Total number of PDF views: 2783 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 6th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The principles, definition and dimensions of the new nutrition science
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The principles, definition and dimensions of the new nutrition science
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The principles, definition and dimensions of the new nutrition science
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *