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The potential link between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and post-exercise airway narrowing across puberty: a longitudinal cohort study

  • Sam R Emerson (a1), Sara K Rosenkranz (a1), Richard R Rosenkranz (a1), Stephanie P Kurti (a2) and Craig A Harms (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

The prevalence of asthma is rising, presenting serious public health challenges. Recent data suggest that sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption plays a role in asthma aetiology. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether SSB consumption is linked to post-exercise airway narrowing (predictor of asthma development) across puberty.

Design

Participants completed pulmonary function tests, physical activity and dietary habit questionnaires, and an exercise test to exhaustion.

Setting

Community in Manhattan, Kansas, USA.

Subjects

We recruited ten boys and ten girls from an original cohort of forty participants tested in our laboratory approximately 5 years prior. Participants were aged 9·7 (sd 0·9) years at baseline and 14·7 (sd 0·9) years at follow-up.

Results

Pre-puberty, boys consumed 6·8 (sd 4·8) servings/week and girls consumed 6·9 (sd 3·7) servings/week, while post-puberty boys consumed 11·5 (sd 5·3) servings/week and girls consumed 7·7 (sd 4·3) servings/week. Using Pearson correlation, SSB consumption was not significantly related to post-exercise airway narrowing at pre-puberty (r=−0·35, P=0·130). In linear regression analyses, SSB consumption was significantly related to post-exercise airway narrowing post-puberty before (standardized β=−0·60, P=0·005) but not after (standardized β=−0·33, P=0·211) adjustment for confounders. Change in SSB consumption from pre- to post-puberty was significantly associated with post-exercise airway narrowing post-puberty (r=−0·61, P=0·010) and change in post-exercise airway narrowing from pre- to post-puberty (r=−0·45, P=0·048) when assessed via Pearson correlations.

Conclusions

These findings suggest a possible link between SSB consumption and asthma development during maturation. Reduced SSB intake may be a possible public health avenue for blunting rising asthma prevalence.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email same@ksu.edu

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