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The potential impact of animal protein intake on global and abdominal obesity: evidence from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX) study

  • Ala’a Alkerwi (a1), Nicolas Sauvageot (a1), Jonathan D Buckley (a2), Anne-Françoise Donneau (a3), Adelin Albert (a3), Michèle Guillaume (a3) and Georgina E Crichton (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

To examine the association of total animal protein intake and protein derived from different dietary sources (meat; fish and shellfish; eggs; milk products) with global and abdominal obesity among adults in Luxembourg.

Design

Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between animal protein intake (as a percentage of total energy intake) and global obesity (BMI≥30·0 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥102 cm for men and ≥88 cm for women), after controlling for potential confounders.

Setting

Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX) study.

Subjects

The study population was derived from a national cross-sectional stratified sample of 1152 individuals aged 18–69 years, recruited between November 2007 and January 2009.

Results

There was an independent positive association between total animal protein intake and both global (OR=1·18; 95 % CI 1·12, 1·25) and abdominal obesity (OR=1·14; 95 % CI 1·08, 1·20) after adjustment for age, gender, education, smoking, physical activity and intakes of total fat, carbohydrate, fibre, and fruit and vegetables. Protein intakes from meat, fish and shellfish were positively associated with global and abdominal obesity with further adjustment for vegetal protein and other sources of animal-derived protein (all P<0·01). Protein derived from eggs or milk products was unrelated to global or abdominal obesity.

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that protein derived from animal sources, in particular from meat, fish and shellfish, may be associated with increased risk of both global and abdominal obesity among presumably healthy adults in Luxembourg. These findings suggest that lower animal protein intakes may be important for maintenance of healthy body weight.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email alaa.alkerwi@crp-sante.lu

References

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Keywords

The potential impact of animal protein intake on global and abdominal obesity: evidence from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX) study

  • Ala’a Alkerwi (a1), Nicolas Sauvageot (a1), Jonathan D Buckley (a2), Anne-Françoise Donneau (a3), Adelin Albert (a3), Michèle Guillaume (a3) and Georgina E Crichton (a1) (a2)...

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