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Physical activity-equivalent label reduces consumption of discretionary snack foods

  • Isabella E Hartley (a1), Russell SJ Keast (a1) and Dijn G Liem (a1)

Abstract

Objective

The present research aimed to investigate the impact of the physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE) front-of-pack label on consumption, prospective consumption and liking of familiar and unfamiliar discretionary snack foods.

Design

In a within-subject randomised design, participants tasted and rated liking (9-point hedonic scale) and prospective consumption (9-point category scale) of four different snack foods with four different labels (i.e. blank, fake, PACE, PACE doubled) and four control snack foods. The twenty snack foods were presented during two 45 min sessions (i.e. ten snack foods per session) which were separated by one week. The amount participants sampled of each snack food was measured.

Setting

The study was conducted in the Centre for Advanced Sensory Sciences laboratory at Deakin University, Australia.

Subjects

The participants were 153 university students (126 females, twenty-seven males, mean age 24·3 (sd 4·9) years) currently enrolled in an undergraduate nutrition degree at Deakin University.

Results

When the PACE label was present on familiar snack foods, participants sampled 9·9 % (22·8 (sem 1·4) v. 25·3 (sem 1·5) g, P=0·03) less than when such label was not present. This was in line with a decreased prospective snack food consumption of 9·1 % (3·0 (sem 0·2) v. 3·3 (sem 0·2) servings, P=0·03). Such pattern was not seen in unfamiliar snacks.

Conclusions

The PACE label appears to be a promising way to decrease familiar discretionary snack food consumption in young, health-minded participants.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email gie.liem@deakin.edu.au

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Keywords

Physical activity-equivalent label reduces consumption of discretionary snack foods

  • Isabella E Hartley (a1), Russell SJ Keast (a1) and Dijn G Liem (a1)

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