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Nutrition, public health, and the new nutrition science: Academic thought, professional action

  • Barrie Margetts
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References

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2Miller, M, Wetterstrom, W. The beginnings of agriculture: the ancient Near East and North Africa [Volume 2, Part 5, Chapter A]. In: Kiple, K, Ornelas, K, eds. The Cambridge World History of Food. Cambridge: University Press, 2000.
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6Garrett, L. Betrayal of Trust. The Collapse of Global Public Health. New York: Hyperion, 2000.
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8Global Health Watch 2005–2006. An Alternative World Health Report. London: Zed Books, 2006.
9The Giessen Declaration. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8(6A): 783–6.
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11Cannon, G. Dear friends and colleagues, let's get real [Letter to the Editor]. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 9(4): 531.
12Margetts, BM, Vorster, HH, Venter, CS. Evidence-based nutrition-review of epidemiological studies. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2002; 15: 6873.
13Margetts, BM. Stopping the rot in nutrition science [Editorial]. Public Health Nurtition 2006; 9(2): 169173.
14Patsopoulos, NA, Loannidis, JP, Analatos, AA. Origin and funding of the most frequently cited papers in medicine: database analysis. British Medical Journal 2006; 332(7549): 1061–4.
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16Office of Communication. Television Advertising of Food and Drink Products to Children: Options for New Restrictions. A Consultation [online], published 28 03 2006. Available at http://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/foodads/
17Bingham, S, Luben, R, Welch, A, Wareham, N, Khaw, K-T, Day, N. Are imprecise methods obscuring a relationship between fat and breast cancer? Lancet 2003; 382(9379): 212–4.
18Kristal, A, Peters, U, Potter, J. Is it time to abandon the food frequency questionnaire? [Editorial]. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 2005; 14(12): 2026–8.
19Sixth International Conference on Dietary Assessment MethodsCophenhagen27–29 April 2006. Homepage: http://www.icdam6.dk

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