Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Micronutrients and infections: Report of a multidisciplinary workshop held in Southampton, UK, 4–6 October 1998

  • Wellcome Trust and United States Agency for International Development
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Micronutrients and infections: Report of a multidisciplinary workshop held in Southampton, UK, 4–6 October 1998
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Micronutrients and infections: Report of a multidisciplinary workshop held in Southampton, UK, 4–6 October 1998
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Micronutrients and infections: Report of a multidisciplinary workshop held in Southampton, UK, 4–6 October 1998
      Available formats
      ×

Abstract

  • An abstract is not available for this content so a preview has been provided below. To view the full text please use the links above to select your preferred format.

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email iohn@soton.ac.uk

References

Hide All
1Scrimshaw, NS, Taylor, CE, Gordon, JE. Interaction of nutrition and infection. Am. J. Med. Sci. 1959; 237: 367403.
2Chandra, RK, Kumari, S. Nutrition and immunity: an overview. J. Nutr. 1994; 124 (Suppl.): 1433–5.
3Maberly, GF, Trowbridge, FL, Yip, R, Sullivan, KM, West, CE. Program against micronutrient malnutrition: ending hidden hunger. Ann. Rev. Public Health 1994; 15: 277301.
4Beaton, GH, Martorell, M, Aronson, KJ et al. Effectiveness of Vitamin A Supplementation in the Control of Young Child Morbidity and Mortality in Developing Countries. State-of-the-Art Series, Nutrition Policy Discussion Paper No. 13. Geneva: ACC/SCN, 1993.
5Fawzi, WW, Chalmers, TC, Herrera, MG, Mosteller, F. Vitamin A supplementation and childhood mortality. A meta-analysis. JAMA 1993; 269: 898903.
6Glasziou, PP, Mackerras, DEM. Vitamin A supplementation in infectious disease: a meta-analysis. BMJ 1993; 306: 366–70.
7Hussey, GD, Klein, H. A randomized, controlled trial of vitamin A in children with severe measles. N. Engl. J. Med. 1990; 323: 160–4.
8West, KP, Katz, J, Khatry, SK et al. Double-blind, cluster randomized trial of low dose supplementation with vitamin A or β carotene on mortality related to pregnancy in Nepal. BMJ 1999; 318: 570–5.
9Roy, SK, Tomkins, AM, Akramuzzaman, SM et al. Randomised controlled trial of zinc supplementation in malnourished Bangladeshi children with diarrhoea. Arch. Dis. Child. 1997; 77: 196200.
10Sazawal, S, Black, RE, Bhan, MK et al. Zinc supplementation reduces the incidence of persistent diarrhea and dysentery among low socioeconomic children in India. J. Nutr. 1996; 126: 443–50.
11Brünser, O, Espinoza, J, Araya, M, Pacheco, I, Cruchet, S. Chronic iron intake and diarrhoeal disease in infants. A field study in a less-developed country. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1993; 47: 317–26.
12Heresi, G, Pizarro, F, Olivares, M et al. Effect of supplementation with iron-fortified milk on incidence of diarrhea and respiratory-infection in urban resident infants. Scand. J. Infect. Dis. 1995; 27: 385–9.
13Keusch, GT. Infection: nutritional interaction. In: Sadler, MJ, Strain, JJ, Caballero, B, eds. Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition. London: Academic Press, 1998.
14Council of Internation Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS). International Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects. Geneva: WHO, 1993.
15Tang, AM, Graham, NMH, Kirby, AJ, McCall, LD, Saah, AJ. Dietary micronutrient intake and risk for progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in human-immunodeficiency-virus type-1 (HIV-1) infected homosexual men. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1993; 138: 937–61.
16Tang, AM, Graham, NMH, Saah, AJ. Effects of micronutrient intake on survival in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1996; 143: 1244–56.
17Underwood, BA. Micronutrient malnutrition. Is it being eliminated? Nutr. Today 1998; 33(3): 121–9.

Micronutrients and infections: Report of a multidisciplinary workshop held in Southampton, UK, 4–6 October 1998

  • Wellcome Trust and United States Agency for International Development

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed