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Measures of self-efficacy and norms for low-fat milk consumption are reliable and related to beverage consumption among 5th graders at school lunch

  • Victoria J Thompson (a1), Christine Bachman (a2), Kathy Watson (a3), Tom Baranowski (a3) and Karen W Cullen (a3)...

Abstract

Objective

To determine the reliability and validity of scales measuring low-fat milk consumption self-efficacy and norms during school lunch among a cohort of 5th graders.

Design

Two hundred and seventy-five students completed lunch food records and a psychosocial questionnaire measuring self-efficacy and norms for school lunch low-fat milk consumption during the fall and spring semesters of the 1998–1999 academic year. Test–retest reliability was assessed in participants who also completed the questionnaire in the spring semester (n = 262). Principal component analyses identified and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed latent variables. Bivariate correlations measured construct validity.

Setting

Houston-area middle school.

Subjects

Fifth graders (n = 275) from one middle school in southeast Texas.

Results

Two scales measuring psychosocial influences of low-fat milk consumption were identified and proved reliable in this population: milk self-efficacy and milk norms. Milk self-efficacy and norms were positively correlated with milk consumption and negatively correlated with consumption of sweetened beverages.

Conclusions

These questionnaires can be used in similar interventions to measure the impact of self-efficacy and norms for drinking low-fat milk during school lunch.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Corresponding author: Email vthompso@mdanderson.org

References

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