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Factors associated with longitudinal food record compliance in a paediatric cohort study

  • Jimin Yang (a1), Kristian F Lynch (a1), Ulla M Uusitalo (a1), Kristina Foterek (a2), Sandra Hummel (a3), Katherine Silvis (a4), Carin Andrén Aronsson (a5), Anne Riikonen (a6), Marian Rewers (a7), Jin-Xiong She (a4), Anette G Ziegler (a3), Olli G Simell (a8), Jorma Toppari (a9), William A Hagopian (a10), Åke Lernmark (a5), Beena Akolkar (a11), Jeffrey P Krischer (a1), Jill M Norris (a12), Suvi M Virtanen (a13), Suzanne B Johnson (a14) and the TEDDY Study Group...

Abstract

Objective

Non-compliance with food record submission can induce bias in nutritional epidemiological analysis and make it difficult to draw inference from study findings. We examined the impact of demographic, lifestyle and psychosocial factors on such non-compliance during the first 3 years of participation in a multidisciplinary prospective paediatric study.

Design

The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study collects a 3 d food record quarterly during the first year of life and semi-annually thereafter. High compliance with food record completion was defined as the participating families submitting one or more days of food record at every scheduled clinic visit.

Setting

Three centres in the USA (Colorado, Georgia/Florida and Washington) and three in Europe (Finland, Germany and Sweden).

Subjects

Families who finished the first 3 years of TEDDY participation (n 8096).

Results

High compliance was associated with having a single child, older maternal age, higher maternal education and father responding to study questionnaires. Families showing poor compliance were more likely to be living far from the study centres, from ethnic minority groups, living in a crowded household and not attending clinic visits regularly. Postpartum depression, maternal smoking behaviour and mother working outside the home were also independently associated with poor compliance.

Conclusions

These findings identified specific groups for targeted strategies to encourage completion of food records, thereby reducing potential bias in multidisciplinary collaborative research.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email jimin.yang@epi.usf.edu

Footnotes

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A full list of the TEDDY Study Group is provided in the online supplementary material.

Footnotes

References

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Supplementary materials

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Yang supplementary material 1

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