Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Eating breakfast together as a family: mealtime experiences and associations with dietary intake among adolescents in rural Minnesota, USA

  • Nicole Larson (a1), Qi Wang (a2), Jerica M Berge (a3), Amy Shanafelt (a3) and Marilyn S Nanney (a3)...

Abstract

Objective

Although existing evidence links breakfast frequency to better dietary quality, little is known specifically in regard to the benefits associated with eating breakfast together with one’s family. The present study describes the prevalence and experience of having family meals at breakfast among rural families and examines associations between meal frequency and adolescent diet quality.

Design

Data were drawn from Project BreakFAST, a group-randomized trial aimed at increasing school breakfast participation in rural Minnesota high schools, USA. Linear mixed models were used to examine associations between student reports of family breakfast frequency and Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) scores while accounting for clustering within schools, demographics and household food security.

Setting

Adolescent students from sixteen schools completed online surveys, height and weight measurements, and dietary recalls at baseline in 2012–2014.

Subjects

The sample included 827 adolescents (55·1 % girls) in grades 9–10 who reported eating breakfast on at most three days per school week.

Results

On average, adolescents reported eating breakfast with their family 1·3 (sd 1·9) times in the past week. Family breakfast meals occurred most frequently in the homes of adolescents who reported a race other than white (P=0·002) or Hispanic ethnicity (P=0·02). Family breakfast frequency was directly associated with adolescent involvement in preparing breakfast meals (P<0·001) and positive attitudes (P≤0·01) about mealtime importance, interactions and structure. Family breakfast frequency was unrelated to most diet quality markers.

Conclusions

Family meals may be one important context of opportunity for promoting healthy food patterns at breakfast. Additional research is needed to better inform and evaluate strategies.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Eating breakfast together as a family: mealtime experiences and associations with dietary intake among adolescents in rural Minnesota, USA
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Eating breakfast together as a family: mealtime experiences and associations with dietary intake among adolescents in rural Minnesota, USA
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Eating breakfast together as a family: mealtime experiences and associations with dietary intake among adolescents in rural Minnesota, USA
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email larsonn@umn.edu

References

Hide All
1. Woodruff, S & Hanning, R (2009) Associations between family dinner frequency and specific food behaviors among grade six, seven, and eight students from Ontario and Nova Scotia. J Adolesc Health 44, 431436.
2. Fulkerson, J, Kubik, M, Story, M et al. (2009) Are there nutritional and other benefits associated with family meals among at-risk youth? J Adolesc Health 45, 389395.
3. Gillman, M, Rifas-Shiman, S, Frazier, A et al. (2000) Family dinner and diet quality among older children and adolescents. Arch Fam Med 9, 235240.
4. Neumark-Sztainer, D, Hannan, P, Story, M et al. (2003) Family meal patterns: associations with sociodemographic characteristics and improved dietary intake among adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc 103, 317322.
5. Videon, T & Manning, C (2003) Influences on adolescent eating patterns: the importance of family meals. J Adolesc Health 32, 365373.
6. Burgess-Champoux, T, Larson, N, Neumark-Sztainer, D et al. (2009) Are family meal patterns associated with overall diet quality during the transition from early to middle adolescence? J Nutr Educ Behav 41, 7986.
7. Boutelle, K, Lytle, L, Murray, D et al. (2001) Perceptions of the family mealtime environment and adolescent mealtime behavior: do adults and adolescents agree? J Nutr Educ Behav 33, 128133.
8. Fulkerson, JA, Neumark-Sztainer, D & Story, M (2006) Adolescent and parent views of family meals. J Am Diet Assoc 106, 526532.
9. Rampersaud, G, Pereira, M, Girard, B et al. (2005) Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight, and academic performance in children and adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc 105, 743760.
10. Larson, N, MacLehose, R, Fulkerson, J et al. (2013) Eating breakfast and dinner together as a family: associations with sociodemographic characteristics and implications for diet quality and weight status. J Acad Nutr Diet 113, 16011609.
11. Fulkerson, J, Larson, N, Horning, M et al. (2014) A review of associations between family or shared meal frequency and dietary and weight status outcomes across the lifespan. J Nutr Educ Behav 46, 219.
12. Woodruff, S, Hanning, R, McGoldrick, K et al. (2010) Healthy Eating Index-C is positively associated with family dinner frequency among students in grades 6–8 from Southern Ontario, Canada. Eur J Clin Nutr 64, 454460.
13. Andaya, A, Arredondo, E, Alcaraz, J et al. (2011) The association between family meals, TV viewing during meals, and fruit, vegetables, soda, and chips intake among Latino children. J Nutr Educ Behav 43, 308315.
14. Carson, J (2015) Many Eligible Children Don’t Participte in School Nutrition Programs: Reauthorization Offers Opportunities to Improve. Durham, NH: Carsey School of Public Policy, University of New Hampshire; available at https://carsey.unh.edu/publication/child-school-nutrition-programs
15. Johnson, J & Johnson, A (2015) Urban–rural differences in childhood and adolescent obesity in the United States: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Child Obes 11, 233241.
16. Liu, J, Bennett, K, Harun, N et al. (2008) Urban–rural differences in overweight status and physical inactivity among US children aged 10–17 years. J Rural Health 24, 407415.
17. Liu, J, Jones, S, Sun, H et al. (2012) Diet, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors as risk factors for childhood obesity: an urban and rural comparison. Child Obes 8, 440448.
18. Goodwin, D, Knol, L, Eddy, J et al. (2006) Sociodemographic correlates of overall quality of dietary intake of US adolescents. Nutr Res 26, 105110.
19. Coleman-Jensen, A, Rabbitt, M, Gregory, C et al. (2015) Household Food Security in the United States in 2014. Economic Research Report no. ERR-194. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Econcomic Research Service; available at http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research-report/err194.aspx
20. Nanney, MS, Shanafelt, A, Wang, Q et al. (2016) Project BreakFAST: rationale, design, and recruitment and enrollment methods of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate an intervention to improve School Breakfast Program participation in rural high schools. Contemp Clin Trials Commun (In the Press); available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2451865415300399
21. Nutrition Coordinating Center, University of Minnesota (2014) Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR) Software. http://www.ncc.umn.edu/products/
22. Larson, N, Hannan, P, Fulkerson, J et al. (2014) Secular trends in fast-food restaurant use among adolescents and maternal caregivers from 1999 to 2010. Am J Public Health 104, e62e69.
23. Neumark-Sztainer, D, Maclehose, R, Loth, K et al. (2014) What’s for dinner? Types of food served at family dinner differ across parent and family characteristics. Public Health Nutr 17, 145155.
24. Larson, NI, Story, M, Eisenberg, ME et al. (2006) Food preparation and purchasing roles among adolescents: associations with sociodemographic characteristics and diet quality. J Am Diet Assoc 106, 211228.
25. Neumark-Sztainer, D, Wall, M, Story, M et al. (2004) Are family meal patterns associated with disordered eating behaviors among adolescents? J Adolesc Health 35, 350359.
26. Hogen, P (1988) The relationship between individual psychological characteristics and factors associated with family use of food as predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescents. PhD Thesis, University of Hartford.
27. Connell, C, Nord, M, Lofton, K et al. (2004) Food security of older children can be assessed using a standardized survey instrument. J Nutr 134, 25662572.
28. Guenther, P, Casavale, K, Reedy, J et al. (2013) Update of the Healthy Eating Index: HEI-2010. J Acad Nutr Diet 113, 569580.
29. Guenther, P, Kirkpatrick, S, Reedy, J et al. (2014) The Healthy Eating Index-2010 is a valid and reliable measure of diet quality according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. J Nutr 144, 399407.
30. Hearst, M, Shanafelt, A, Wang, Q et al. (2016) Barriers, benefits and behaviors related to breakfast consumption among rural adolescents. J Sch Health 86, 187194.
31. Fulkerson, J, Farbakhsh, K, Lytle, L et al. (2011) Away-from-home family dinner sources and associations with weight status, body composition, and related biomarkers of chronic disease among adolescents and their parents. J Am Diet Assoc 111, 18921897.
32. Boutelle, K, Fulkerson, J, Neumark-Sztainer, D et al. (2007) Fast food for family meals: relationships with parent and adolescent food intake, home food environment and weight status. Public Health Nutr 10, 1623.
33. Vaitkeviciute, R, Ball, L & Harris, N (2015) The relationship between food literacy and dietary intake in adolescents: a systematic review. Public Health Nutr 18, 649658.
34. Larson, N & Story, M (2009) A review of environmental influences on food choices. Ann Behav Med 38, Suppl. 1, S56S73.
35. Berge, J, Jin, S, Hannan, P et al. (2013) Structural and interpersonal characteristics of family meals: associations with adolescent BMI and dietary patterns. J Acad Nutr Diet 113, 816822.
36. Bolin, J & Bellamy, G (2012) Rural Healthy People 2020. https://sph.tamhsc.edu/srhrc/docs/rhp2020.pdf (accessed February 2016).
37. O’Neil, C, Byrd-Bredbenner, C, Hayes, D et al. (2014) The role of breakfast in health: definition and criteria for a quality breakfast. J Acad Nutr Diet 114, 12 Suppl., S8S26.
38. Chu, Y, Farmer, A, Fung, C et al. (2013) Involvement in home meal preparation is associated with food preference and self-efficacy among Canadian children. Public Health Nutr 16, 108112.
39. Woodruff, S & Kirby, A (2013) The associations among family meal frequency, food preparation frequency, self-efficacy for cooking, and food preparation techniques in children and adolescents. J Nutr Educ Behav 45, 296303.
40. Neumark-Sztainer, D, Larson, N, Fulkerson, J et al. (2010) Family meals and adolescents: what have we learned from Project EAT (Eating Among Teens)? Public Health Nutr 13, 11131121.
41. Larson, N, Story, M, Wall, M et al. (2006) Calcium and dairy intakes of adolescents are associated with their home environment, taste preferences, personal health beliefs, and meal patterns. J Am Diet Assoc 106, 18161824.
42. Mullan, B, Wong, C, Kothe, E et al. (2014) An examination of the demographic predictors of adolescent breakfast consumption, content, and context. BMC Public Health 14, 264.
43. Wheaton, A, Ferro, G & Croft, J (2015) School start times for middle school and high school students – United States, 2011–12 school year. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 64, 809813.
44. Adolescent Sleep Working Group; Committee on Adolescence; Council on School Health (2014) School start times for adolescents. Pediatrics 134, 642649.
45. Bruening, M, MacLehose, R, Loth, K et al. (2012) Feeding a family in a recession: food insecurity among Minnesota parents. Am J Public Health 102, 520526.
46. Widome, R, Neumark-Sztainer, D, Hannan, P et al. (2009) Eating when there is not enough to eat: eating behaviors and perceptions of food among food-insecure youths. Am J Public Health 99, 822828.

Keywords

Eating breakfast together as a family: mealtime experiences and associations with dietary intake among adolescents in rural Minnesota, USA

  • Nicole Larson (a1), Qi Wang (a2), Jerica M Berge (a3), Amy Shanafelt (a3) and Marilyn S Nanney (a3)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed