Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Designing the eatwell week: the application of eatwell plate advice to weekly food intake

  • Wilma S Leslie (a1), Fiona Comrie (a2), Michael EJ Lean (a1) and Catherine R Hankey (a1)

Abstract

Objective

To develop a menu and resource to illustrate to consumers and health professionals what a healthy balanced diet looks like over the course of a week.

Design

Development and analysis of an illustrative 7 d ‘eatwell week’ menu to meet current UK recommendations for nutrients with a Dietary Reference Value, with a daily energy base of 8368 kJ (2000 kcal). Foods were selected using market research data on meals and snacks commonly consumed by UK adults. Analysis used the food composition data set from year 1 (2008) of the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey rolling programme. The eatwell week menu was developed using an iterative process of nutritional analysis with adjustments made to portion sizes and the inclusion/exclusion of foods in order to achieve the target macronutrient composition.

Results

Three main meals and two snacks were presented as interchangeable within the weekdays and two weekend days to achieve adult food and nutrient recommendations. Main meals were based on potatoes, rice or pasta with fish (two meals; one oily), red meat (two meals), poultry or vegetarian accompaniments. The 5-a-day target for fruit and vegetables (range 5–6·7 portions) was achieved daily. Mean salt content was below recommended maximum levels (<6 g/d). All key macro- and micronutrient values were achieved.

Conclusions

Affordable foods, and those widely consumed by British adults, can be incorporated within a 7 d healthy balanced menu. Future research should investigate the effect of using the eatwell week on adults’ dietary habits and health-related outcomes.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Designing the eatwell week: the application of eatwell plate advice to weekly food intake
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Designing the eatwell week: the application of eatwell plate advice to weekly food intake
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Designing the eatwell week: the application of eatwell plate advice to weekly food intake
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email Wilma.Leslie@glasgow.ac.uk

References

Hide All
1.World Health Organization (2003) Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases. Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. WHO Technical Report Series no. 916. Geneva: WHO.
2.The Scottish Government (1996) Eating for Health: A Diet Action Plan for Scotland. London: HMSO.
3.HM Government (2010) Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our Strategy for Public Health in England. London: TSO; available at http://www.official-documents.gov.uk/document/cm79/7985/7985.pdf
4.Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (2010) Food 2030. http://sd.defra.gov.uk/2010/01/food-2030/ (accessed April 2011).
5.The Scottish Government (2010) Preventing Overweight and Obesity in Scotland: A Route Map Towards Healthy Weight. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/02/17140721/19 (accessed May 2010).
6.Food Standards Agency (2010) The eatwell plate. http://tna.europarchive.org/20100929190231/http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthydiet/eatwellplate/ (accessed April 2011).
7.Lang, T, Dowler, E & Hunter, D (2006) Review of the Scottish Diet Action Plan: Progress and Impacts 1996–2005. Edinburgh: Health Scotland.
8. Barton KL, Wrieden WL, Armstrong J et al. (2011) Estimation of food and nutrient intakes from Expenditure and Food Survey & Living Costs and Food Survey Data in Scotland 2001–2009. Report to the Food Standards Agency Scotland, 31st March 2011. http://www.foodbase.org.uk//admintools/reportdocuments/418-1-1141_S14035_Monitoring_Report_2001-2009_310311final.pdf (accessed May 2011).
9.Department of Health (2011) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Headline results from Years 1 and 2 (combined) of the Rolling Programme, 2008/9–2009/10. http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsStatistics/DH_128166 (accessed July 2011).
10. Barton KL, Wrieden WL, Armstrong J et al. (2010) Estimation of Food and Nutrient Intakes from Expenditure and Food Survey Data in Scotland 2001–2006. http://www.foodbase.org.uk//admintools/reportdocuments/418-1-1027_S14035_Final.pdf (accessed May 2011).
11.Department of Health (1991) Dietary Reference Values for Food, Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom. London: HMSO.
12.Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (2010) Iron and Health. London: TSO; available at http://www.sacn.gov.uk/reports_position_statements/reports/sacn_iron_and_health_report.html
13.Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (2003) Salt and Health. London: TSO; available at http://www.sacn.gov.uk/reports_position_statements/reports/salt_and_health_report.html
14.Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (2009) Energy Requirements Draft Working Group Report. http://www.sacn.gov.uk/reports_position_statements/reports/draft_energy_requirements_report_scientific_consultation_-november_2009.html (accessed August 2011).
15. Bromley C, Corbett J, Day J et al. (2011) Scottish Health Survey 2010 – Volume 1: Main report. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/09/27084018/0 (accessed September 2011).
16.Food Standards Agency (2002) Food Portion Sizes, 3rd ed. London: TSO.
17.Food Standards Agency (2002) McCance and Widdowson's the Composition of Foods, 6th summary ed. Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry.
18.Food Standards Agency (2010) Eat well, be well – Recipes. http://tna.europarchive.org/20100929190231/http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthydiet/recipes/ (accessed April 2011).
19.National Obesity Observatory (2011) Knowledge and attitudes to healthy eating and physical activity: what the data tell us. http://www.noo.org.uk/uploads/doc/vid_11171_Attitudes.pdf (accessed October 2011).
20. Macdiarmid J, Kyle J, Horgan G et al. (2011) Livewell: a balance of healthy and sustainable food choices. http://assets.wwf.org.uk/downloads/livewell_report_corrected.pdf (accessed April 2011).
21.Scottish Centre for Social Research (2011) A survey of 24 hour urinary sodium excretion in a representative sample of the Scottish population as a measure of salt intake. http://www.foodbase.org.uk//admintools/reportdocuments/681-1-1229_S14047.pdf (accessed November 2011).

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Designing the eatwell week: the application of eatwell plate advice to weekly food intake

  • Wilma S Leslie (a1), Fiona Comrie (a2), Michael EJ Lean (a1) and Catherine R Hankey (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.