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Barriers and facilitators to following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans reported by rural, Northern Plains American-Indian children

  • Lisa Jahns (a1), Leander McDonald (a2), Ann Wadsworth (a2), Charles Morin (a3), Yan Liu (a4) and Theresa Nicklas (a4)...

Abstract

Objective

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) promote healthy dietary choices for all Americans aged 2 years and older; however, the majority of Americans do not meet recommendations. The goal of the present study was to identify both barriers and facilitators to adherence to DGA recommendations for consumption of five recommended food groups: grains (specifically whole grains), vegetables, fruits, meat/beans and milk (specifically reduced-fat/non-fat), among American-Indian children.

Design

Nominal group technique sessions were conducted to identify and prioritize children’s perceived barriers and facilitators to following the DGA, as presented in the ‘MyPyramid’ consumer education icon. After response generation to a single question about each food group (e.g. ‘What sorts of things make it harder (or easier) for kids to follow the MyPyramid recommendation for vegetables?’), children individually ranked their top five most salient responses. Ranked responses are presented verbatim.

Setting

A rural Northern Plains American-Indian reservation, USA.

Subjects

Sixty-one self-selected fifth-grade children.

Results

Core barriers for all food groups studied included personal preference (i.e. ‘don’t like’) and environmental (i.e. ‘cost too much’; ‘store is too far to get them’; ‘grandma don’t have’). Core facilitators included suggestions, i.e. ‘make a garden and plant vegetables’; ‘tell your friends to eat healthy’.

Conclusions

Barriers and facilitators are dissimilar for individual food groups, suggesting that dietary interventions should target reduction of barriers and promotion of facilitators specific to individual food groups recommended by the DGA.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author:lisa.jahns@ars.usda.gov

References

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Keywords

Barriers and facilitators to following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans reported by rural, Northern Plains American-Indian children

  • Lisa Jahns (a1), Leander McDonald (a2), Ann Wadsworth (a2), Charles Morin (a3), Yan Liu (a4) and Theresa Nicklas (a4)...

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