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Association of eating speed and energy intake of main meals with overweight in Chinese pre-school children

  • Ming Lin (a1), Liping Pan (a2), Lixia Tang (a3), Jingxiong Jiang (a2), Yan Wang (a2) and Runming Jin (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the association between eating behaviours (eating speed and energy intake of main meals) and overweight in pre-school children.

Design

Cross-sectional study. Data consisted of measurements (height and weight), questionnaire information (eating behaviours of eating speed and overeating) and on-site observation data (meal duration and energy intake of main meals).

Setting

Seven kindergartens in Beijing, China.

Subjects

Pre-school children (n 1138; age range 3·1–6·7 years old) from seven kindergartens participated in the study.

Results

The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of overweight in participants with parent-reported ‘more than needed food intake’ was 3·02 (95 % CI 2·06, 4·44) compared with the ‘medium food intake’ participants, and higher eating speed was associated with childhood overweight. For the two observed eating behaviours, each 418·7 kJ (100 kcal) increase of lunch energy intake significantly increased the likelihood for overweight by a factor of 1·445, and each 5-min increase in meal duration significantly decreased the likelihood for overweight by a factor of 0·861. Increased portions of rice and cooked dishes were significantly associated with overweight status (OR = 2·274; 95 % CI 1·360, 3·804 and OR = 1·378; 95 % CI 1·010, 1·881, respectively).

Conclusions

Eating speed and excess energy intake of main meals are associated with overweight in pre-school children.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email jinrunming@yeah.net

References

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Keywords

Association of eating speed and energy intake of main meals with overweight in Chinese pre-school children

  • Ming Lin (a1), Liping Pan (a2), Lixia Tang (a3), Jingxiong Jiang (a2), Yan Wang (a2) and Runming Jin (a1)...

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