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Assessment of physical activity using accelerometry, an activity diary, the heart rate method and the Indian Migration Study questionnaire in South Indian adults

  • Ankalmadagu V Bharathi (a1), Rebecca Kuriyan (a1), Anura V Kurpad (a1), Tinku Thomas (a1), Shah Ebrahim (a2), Sanjay Kinra (a2), Tanica Lyngdoh (a3), Srinath K Reddy (a4) (a5), Prabhakaran Dorairaj (a5) and Mario Vaz (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To validate questionnaire-based physical activity level (PAL) against accelerometry and a 24 h physical activity diary (24 h AD) as reference methods (Protocol 2), after validating these reference methods against the heart rate–oxygen consumption (HRVO2) method (Protocol 1).

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Setting

Two villages in Andhra Pradesh state and Bangalore city, South India.

Subjects

Ninety-four participants (fifty males, forty-four females) for Protocol 2; thirteen males for Protocol 1.

Results

In Protocol 2, mean PAL derived from the questionnaire (1·72 (sd 0·20)) was comparable to that from the 24 h AD (1·78 (sd 0·20)) but significantly higher than the mean PAL derived from accelerometry (1·36 (sd 0·20); P < 0·001). Mean bias of PAL from the questionnaire was larger against the accelerometer (0·36) than against the 24 h AD (−0·06), but with large limits of agreement against both. Correlations of PAL from the questionnaire with that of the accelerometer (r = 0·28; P = 0·01) and the 24 h AD (r = 0·30; P = 0·006) were modest. In Protocol 1, mean PAL from the 24 h AD (1·65 (sd 0·18)) was comparable, while that from the accelerometer (1·51 (sd 0·23)) was significantly lower (P < 0·001), than mean PAL obtained from the HRVO2 method (1·69 (sd 0·21)).

Conclusions

The questionnaire showed acceptable validity with the reference methods in a group with a wide range of physical activity levels. The accelerometer underestimated PAL in comparison with the HRVO2 method.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email bharathi@iphcr.res.in

References

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Keywords

Assessment of physical activity using accelerometry, an activity diary, the heart rate method and the Indian Migration Study questionnaire in South Indian adults

  • Ankalmadagu V Bharathi (a1), Rebecca Kuriyan (a1), Anura V Kurpad (a1), Tinku Thomas (a1), Shah Ebrahim (a2), Sanjay Kinra (a2), Tanica Lyngdoh (a3), Srinath K Reddy (a4) (a5), Prabhakaran Dorairaj (a5) and Mario Vaz (a1)...

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