Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Probiotic protection of rotavirus gastroenteritis in an experimental rat model in early life
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Probiotic protection of rotavirus gastroenteritis in an experimental rat model in early life
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Probiotic protection of rotavirus gastroenteritis in an experimental rat model in early life
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in children under two years. Previous reports suggest breast-feeding and the use of probiotics and prebiotics as protective agents for moderating the clinical course of rotavirus infection. The present study was designed to establish the utility of the suckling rat rotavirus infection model( 1 ) to evaluate the protective role of probiotics. From 3rd day of life, Lewis neonatal suckling rats received daily 10 mg/mL of a particular bifidobacteria strain. On day 8th of life, a heterologous simian rotavirus SA-11 was inoculated orally in the probiotic group and in a non-supplemented group. Rotavirus infection was evaluated daily by clinical indexes based on color, texture and amount of obtained feces. Fecal samples were used to quantify viral shedding and specific antibody production.A significant reduction in diarrhea incidence was observed in the probiotic group (∼30%) when compared with the non-supplemented group (∼70%) on day 4 after infection (p<0.05). The length of the diarrhea period was also shortened by one day. The disease severity was controlled by the probiotic as is shown by lower severity curve with respect to the non-supplemented animals (AUC of ∼6.1 vs AUC of 8.4, p<0.05) although the viral shedding and specific antibody production pattern was not significantly affected. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the suitability of this model to evaluate the reduction of the incidence and severity of a rotavirus-induced acute gastroenteritis by a daily supplement such as a probiotic.

1. Pérez-Cano, FJ, Castell, M, Castellote, C et al. (2007) Pediatr Res 62, 658663.