Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in children from central Mexico
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in children from central Mexico
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in children from central Mexico
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

E.J. Vargas-Garcia awarded the FSAI student prize for poster communication

Childhood obesity rates remain alarmingly high in middle-income countries such as Mexico. The Metabolic Syndrome (MS) has been identified as a co-morbidity in obese younger populations which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. The Ministry of Health in Guanajuato State, Mexico in 2009 carried out a survey in 899,000 children to monitor their weight, height and thus BMI. An additional biochemical analysis was later performed in 10,798 children who had been identified to be at greater risk of suffering from MS. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of MS according to the International Diabetes Federation Criteria for children( 1 ) in a sample of 6 to 15 year olds living in central Mexico. Components of MS measured were high triglycerides, high fasting glucose and low HDL-C levels, in addition to the presence of obesity in certain subjects.

Values are presented as number of subjects that met criteria of MS within each nutritional diagnosis and percentages and 95% confidence intervals.

Data on BMI and biochemical features was available in 6335 children. Overall 12·3% (data not shown) of the children met the criteria for MS. In comparison to UK data, prevalence of MS in both countries was similar for obese adolescent populations (13·6% vs 14·5%). The most frequent metabolic risk factor was low HDL-C (29·5%; data not shown). Although MS was more prevalent amongst obese children, several children with normal BMI appeared to also fulfil the criteria for MS which could be suggestive of a relationship between abdominal adiposity and impaired metabolic results that has been described in normal-weight adults( 3 ). Surrogate measures like waist circumference are needed to further explore and confirm this.

In the light of these results, which can relate to inadequate dietary and physical activity behaviours, it is clear that more comprehensive screening activities are needed in Mexican primary health care systems along with health education campaigns on lifestyle modification to reduce the risk of developing metabolic syndrome in paediatric populations.

1. Zimmet, P, Alberti, KG, Kaufman, F, et al. (2007). Pediatr diabetes 8, 299306.
2. Wei, C, Ford, A, Hunt, L, et al. (2011). Arch Dis Child 96, 10031007.
3. St-Onge, MP, Janssen, I & Heymsfield, SB (2004). Diabetes care 27, 22222228.