Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Plasma riboflavin concentration as novel indicator for vitamin-B2 status assessment: suggested cutoffs and its association with vitamin-B6 status in women

  • Amy Tan (a1), Mohammad Zubair (a1), Chia-ling Ho (a1), Liadhan McAnena (a2), Helene McNulty (a2), Mary Ward (a2) and Yvonne Lamers (a1)...

Abstract

Riboflavin (vitamin B2), as the coenzymes flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin dinucleotide (FAD), is essential for oxidation-reduction reactions and energy metabolism. Riboflavin also interacts with vitamin B12, B6 and folate in one-carbon metabolism, and is required for the conversion of dietary vitamin B6 forms to the coenzyme pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (PLP). Biochemical riboflavin status is rarely measured given the lack of convenient and accessible biomarkers. The current gold-standard marker is erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient (EGRac) that involves laborious sample processing. High prevalence of riboflavin deficiency (EGRac ≥ 1.4) and suboptimal status (EGRac of 1.3–1.39) have been reported in the UK and Ireland; yet the functional significance is unclear. Plasma riboflavin concentration may serve as an alternative indicator; its association with related metabolites has not yet been investigated. Secondary analysis was conducted to determine the change-point of plasma riboflavin with EGRac, to derive a reference interval for plasma riboflavin, and to determine the association of riboflavin status with plasma PLP, using data of 223 older adult women from a cross-sectional study. Fasting blood samples and sociodemographic, anthropometric and dietary data were available for a convenience sample of 223 older adult women. Plasma PLP and related metabolites were quantified using isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The change-point (95% CI) between EGRac and plasma riboflavin occurred at plasma riboflavin concentration of 26.5 (20.5; 32.5) nmol/L (with EGRac of 1.25). The median (IQR) plasma riboflavin concentration was 15.7 (11.2, 23.8); and the upper and lower limits (90%CI) of the central 95% reference interval were 6.70 (6.33, 7.79) and 64.2 (55.0, 74.6) nmol/L, respectively. Plasma PLP (geometric mean (95%CI)) was significantly lower in women with riboflavin deficiency, 54.0 (46.8, 62.2) nmol/L (n = 64), and suboptimal riboflavin status, 56.1 (48.9, 64.3) nmol/L (n = 48), compared to those with riboflavin adequacy, 135 (112, 161) nmol/L (n = 110). Plasma PLP was positively associated with plasma riboflavin concentration after adjustment for total B6 intake, age, ethnicity, BMI, education, household income and C-reactive protein concentration [β (95% CI) = 1.92 (.670, 3.17) nmol/L; p = 0.003]; a significant interaction between plasma riboflavin and total dietary B6 intake was observed (p = 0.024). In conclusion, we are presenting for the first time a reference range for plasma riboflavin concentration and its change-point with EGRac in healthy women. Vitamin B6 status is strongly associated with riboflavin status; more research is needed to elucidate this relationship in a larger sample and ideally intervention study.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Plasma riboflavin concentration as novel indicator for vitamin-B2 status assessment: suggested cutoffs and its association with vitamin-B6 status in women
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Plasma riboflavin concentration as novel indicator for vitamin-B2 status assessment: suggested cutoffs and its association with vitamin-B6 status in women
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Plasma riboflavin concentration as novel indicator for vitamin-B2 status assessment: suggested cutoffs and its association with vitamin-B6 status in women
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Plasma riboflavin concentration as novel indicator for vitamin-B2 status assessment: suggested cutoffs and its association with vitamin-B6 status in women

  • Amy Tan (a1), Mohammad Zubair (a1), Chia-ling Ho (a1), Liadhan McAnena (a2), Helene McNulty (a2), Mary Ward (a2) and Yvonne Lamers (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.