Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Obesogenic microenvronment, sleep patterns and metabolic profiles in an overweight and obese pregnant population
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Obesogenic microenvronment, sleep patterns and metabolic profiles in an overweight and obese pregnant population
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Obesogenic microenvronment, sleep patterns and metabolic profiles in an overweight and obese pregnant population
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Drivers of maternal adiposity are complicated and constitute more than just an energy imbalance( 1 ). Personal choices and environmental factors also contribute to the rising rates of obesity. The obesogenic environment refers to factors that influence individuals to become excessively overweight( 2 ). They are classified as microenvironments (school, workplace, home, neighbourhood or macro-environments (education and health systems, government policies, societies attitudes and beliefs). We sought to assess the obesogenic microenvironment, sleep patterns and metabolic profiles in an overweight and obese pregnant cohort.

This is a prospective cohort study. Women with BMI >25 kg/m2 were recruited from the antenatal clinic and a lifestyle questionnaire assessing obesogenic risk factors, food behaviors and sleep patterns was administered. Serum samples taken in the first trimester were analyzed for fasting glucose, insulin, HOMA index and lipid profiles.

Fifty women were included in the analysis 36 (72 %) overweight, 14 (28 %) obese. Over 80 % of the group lived adjacent to green space ± gym facilities however all women reported having easy access to fast food outlets. More obese patients left their workplaces at lunch or break times during the week compared to overweight women 36·6. % vs. 42·9 % p = 0·037. The majority reported poor access to work canteen facilities (71·05 %). Obese pregnant women were also less likely to use public transport on their commute to work. Analysis of sleep duration revealed women in the sample slept on average 6·5 hours per night. Metabolic profiling showed significant higher levels of, insulin, c-peptide and HOMA index in the obese when compared to the overweight group.

This study has highlighted deficiencies in the physical, workplace and personal microenvironments that could contribute to maternal adiposity. Government, public health measures and local hospital policies should strive to limit convenience food outlets in the community, strive to improve work based environments and improve sleep hygiene amongst pregnant women. Metabolic derangement is also evident from early pregnancy and may impact on fetal growth and metabolism.

1. Sui, Z, Turnbull, D, Dodd, J, et al. (2013) Australas Med J 6(11), 565–77.
2. Swinburn, B & Egger, G (2002) Obes Rev 3(4), 289301.