Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Milk and dairy food consumption; a comparison between children and adolescents
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Milk and dairy food consumption; a comparison between children and adolescents
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Milk and dairy food consumption; a comparison between children and adolescents
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Adolescence is a transitional phase between childhood and adulthood (13–19 y) characterised by marked physical development, growing independence and changes toward dietary habits( 1 ) that may ultimately persist into adulthood( 2 ). National dietary surveys typically rely on estimated data collection methods and have shown a decline in dairy consumption with increasing age( 3 ). Yet, the broad age range (4–10 y; 11–18 y) categories make it difficult to differentiate between consumption in children and adolescents. Consequently, there is a need to assess dairy consumption in children and adolescents, using more finite age boundaries and more robust dietary assessment tools. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare habitual dairy intake of 9–11 y children [n = 40; mass 33·5 (7·46 kg); BMI 16·8 (3·1 kg/m2)] and 15–18 y adolescents [n = 35; mass 66·2 (15·1 kg); BMI 22·6 (3·5 kg/m2)] using these methods. Subsequently, dietary data was assessed using a combined self-report weighed food record and 24 h dietary recalls, over four consecutive days, (two weekdays and two weekend days). Self-reported dietary habits were extrapolated to determine habitual dairy food consumption (types, amounts and frequencies) and was analysed for differences using a between-group 2 × 2 (age x sex) ANOVA (table 1).

Table 1. Values are presented according to age and sex and displayed as means [SD].

Descriptive data suggested that milk was the most popular dairy product consumed by both children and adolescents. Statistical analysis revealed a main effect for sex on total milk (mL) (F1,71 = 7·07, p = 0·010) and number of daily milk portions (F1,71 = 6·79, p = 0·011). There was no interaction or main effect for any other variable. These data suggest that independent of age, boys consume greater amounts of milk compared to girls. In contrast to existing evidence( 3 ), the findings of the present study would suggest no difference in dairy consumption between children and adolescents. With the exception of boys (9–11 y), total daily portions of dairy are on the lower boundary of the 2–3 recommended servings per day( 4 ), providing evidence to support increasing dairy intake in both children and adolescents.

1. Alberga, AS, Sigal, RJ, Goldfield, G, Prud' homme, D, Kenny, GP (2012) Overweight and obese teenagers: why is adolescence a critical period? Pediatr Obes, 7(4), 261–73.
2. Hallal, P, Victora, C, Azevedo, M, Wells, JK (2006) Adolescent Physical Activity and Health. Sports Med, 36(12), 1019–30.
3. Bates, B, Lennonx, A, Prentice, A, Bates, C, Swan, G. National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Headline results from Years 1, 2 and 3 (combined) of the Rolling Programme (2008/2009- 2010/2011). 2012.
4. Da Silva, MS, Rudkowska, I (2014) Dairy products on metabolic health: Current research and clinical implications. Maturitas, 77(3), 221–8.