Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Investigation of the effects of a slow eating rate protocol on body composition in overweight people, in a 6-week community intervention study
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Investigation of the effects of a slow eating rate protocol on body composition in overweight people, in a 6-week community intervention study
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Investigation of the effects of a slow eating rate protocol on body composition in overweight people, in a 6-week community intervention study
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

The worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity are cause for concern(1). Reducing eating rate may be a promising tool in combating obesity as people who eat quickly tend to consume more calories, be overweight and have lower satiation after a meal(2). However there remains limited evidence of the efficacy of eating rate-based interventions in the community. This study aimed to investigate if a previously developed(3) slow eating rate (SER) protocol could facilitate weight loss in overweight adults in a free-living community setting.

The 15 adult participants recruited to this 10-week parallel, open label randomised controlled trial were randomised to the control group: Cont [n = 7 (3M,4 F), BMI 32·7 ± 4·8 kg/m2, Age 30·5 ± 4·2yrs] or the intervention group: SER [n = 8 (4M,4 F), BMI 29·75 ± 3·3, Age 32·5 ± 3·9]. A favourable ethical opinion was obtained from the University Ethics Committee. Weight, height, BMI,  % body fat,  % visceral fat and energy intake were measured at each of the 4 study visits (see table 1). Participants were video-recorded (to assess eating rate via chew counts) while consuming test meals at their own pace at visits 1 (baseline eating rate (ER)) and 4. Between visits, participants returned to their free-living environment in the community for six weeks. The SER group were asked to follow the SER protocol daily whilst consuming their lunchtime meal whilst the CONT group received no instructions. Monitoring of the SER group was through the study's dedicated website and phone application, using Mixpanel core analytics.

Table 1. Effect of Intervention on Body Composition & Energy Intake.

Data presented as Mean ± standard deviation; BMI, body mass index. 1Paired t test within group, baseline compared to visit 4. 2-Way repeated measures ANOVA, significant effect of intervention, level of significance p ⩽ 0·05.

Repeated measures 2-ways analysis of variances showed a significant effect of treatment group and visit number for all body composition parameters. The intervention group significantly reduced their weight (p = 0·006), BMI (p = 0·005), body fat  % (p = 0·03) and visceral fat (p= 0·007) and showed a trend towards a reduced energy intake (p = 0·086).

This is the first study of its kind to successfully apply a SER protocol in a free-living population and the promising findings warrant further investigation to confirm the role of mindfulness-promoting tools in weight management strategies.

1.Ng, M, Fleming, T, Robinson, M, Thomson, B, Graetz, N, Margono, C et al. (2014) Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Lancet 384, 766781.
2.Ohkuma, T, Hirakawa, Y, Nakamura, U, Kiyohara, Y, Kitazono, T, & Ninomiya, T (2015) Association between eating rate and obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Obes 39(11), 15891596.
3.Koidis, F, Brunger, L, Gibbs, M, & Hampton, S (2014) The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people – A pilot study. e-SPEN Journal 9(2), e54e58.