Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-xl52z Total loading time: 0.618 Render date: 2021-04-17T21:50:19.343Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Improving wheat as a source of dietary fibre for human health

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2015

P. R. Shewry
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AR, UK
S. Reynolds
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AR, UK
T. Pellny
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK
J. Freeman
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK
M. Wilkinson
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK
O. Kosik
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK
M. Ulker
Affiliation:
Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey
L. Wingen
Affiliation:
John Innes Centre, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
S. Orford
Affiliation:
John Innes Centre, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
S. Griffiths
Affiliation:
John Innes Centre, Norwich, NR4 7UH, UK
R. A. C. Mitchell
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK
A. Lovegrove
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden , Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2015 

Wheat is a major source of dietary fibre (DF) in the UK diet, with bread alone providing 20% of the total daily intake in adults( Reference Steer, Thane, Stephen and Jebb 1 ). Furthermore, although white bread contains less DF (2·5–4·5%) than wholemeal (10–14%), the high consumption (about 65% of total bread products) means that it alone contributes 11% of the total intake of DF( Reference Steer, Thane, Stephen and Jebb 1 ). The major DF components in white flour and bread are cell wall polysaccharides, principally arabinoxylan (AX) and β-glucan which account for about 70% and 20% of the total, respectively.

Analyses of 150 wheat cultivars grown on the same site showed that the total content of AX in white flour ranged from 1·35% to 2·75% dry wt, and of soluble AX from 0·30% to 1·40%( Reference Gebruers, Dornez and Bedő 2 ). The proportion of soluble AX was generally about 25% of the total. However, the Chinese cultivar Yumai 34 was shown to contain the highest contents of both total and soluble AX, and is now being exploited by wheat breeders as a source of these traits.

We have now analysed wheat lines of wider genetic diversity, including a core set of lines from the Watkins collection of land races which were collected from 32 European, Asian and North African Countries in the 1920s and 1930s( Reference Miller, Ambrose, Reader, Caligari and Brandham 3 ). Preliminary analyses showed that the range of content of total AX in wholemeal was wider than in the 150 cultivars, with up to 35% soluble AX (Figure 1). This high solubility may be related to differences in the fine structure of AX, particularly the ratio of xylose residues which are substituted with single and two arabinose residues: this is being compared by fingerprinting the patterns of oligosaccharides released after digestion with endoxylanase.

Fig. 1. Content of water-extractable AX (WE-AX) (expressed as % age of total AX) in wholemeal flours of Watkins lines. AX was determined as pentose units( Reference Douglas 4 ).

The lines will be used to improve the DF content and composition of bread wheat. They will also allow us to explore the relationship between the structure and properties of AX and its contribution to human health, including viscosity and prebioitic effects in the colon.

Research at Rothamsted is funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) of the UK.

References

1. Steer, T, Thane, C, Stephen, A & Jebb, S (2008) Proc Nutr Soc 67 (OCE8), E363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Gebruers, K, Dornez, E, Bedő, Z et al. (2010) J Agric Food Chem 58, 93539361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Miller, TE, Ambrose, M & Reader, SM (1999) In: Wheat Taxonomy: the Legacy of John Percival. Caligari, PDS & Brandham, PE (Eds.). Academic Press, pp. 113120.Google Scholar
4. Douglas, SG (1981) Food Chem 7, 139145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 71
Total number of PDF views: 175 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 17th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Improving wheat as a source of dietary fibre for human health
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Improving wheat as a source of dietary fibre for human health
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Improving wheat as a source of dietary fibre for human health
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *