Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

DNA methylation of hypertension-related genes is influenced by the MTHFR 677TT genotype and riboflavin supplementation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2020


Sophia Amenyah
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom Genomics Medicine Research Group, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Mary Ward
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Amy McMahon
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Jennifer Deane
Affiliation:
Genomics Medicine Research Group, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Helene McNulty
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Catherine F. Hughes
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
J.J. Strain
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Geraldine Horigan
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
John Purvis
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Altnagelvin Area Hospital, Londonderry, United Kingdom
Colum P. Walsh
Affiliation:
Genomics Medicine Research Group, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom
Diane J. Lees-Murdock
Affiliation:
Genomics Medicine Research Group, Ulster University, Coleraine, United Kingdom

Abstract

Introduction:

The C677T polymorphism in the folate metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is associated with hypertension. Riboflavin acts as a cofactor for MTHFR in one-carbon metabolism which generates methyl groups for utilisation in important biological reactions such as DNA methylation. Supplementation with riboflavin has previously been shown to lower blood pressure in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype. The mechanism regulating this gene-nutrient interaction is currently unknown but may involve aberrant DNA methylation which has been implicated hypertension.

Objectives:

The aims of this study were to examine DNA methylation of hypertension-related genes in adults stratified by MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of riboflavin supplementation on DNA methylation of these genes in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype.

Materials and Methods:

We measured DNA methylation using pyrosequencing in a set of candidate genes associated with hypertension including angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1), G nucleotide binding protein subunit alpha 12 (GNA12), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3). Stored peripheral blood leukocyte samples from participants previously screened for the MTHFR C677T genotype who participated in targeted randomised controlled trials (1.6mg/d riboflavin or placebo for 16 weeks) at Ulster University were accessed for this analysis (n = 120).

Results:

There were significant differences in baseline average methylation between MTHFR CC and TT genotypes at NOS3 (p = 0.026) and AGTR1 (p = 0.045) loci. Riboflavin supplementation in the TT genotype group resulted in altered average methylation at IGF2 (p = 0.025) and CpG site-specific alterations at the AGTR1 and GNA12 loci.

Conclusion:

DNA methylation at genes related to hypertension were significantly different in individuals stratified by MTHFR genotype group. Furthermore, in MTHFR 677TT genotype individuals, there were concurrent alterations in DNA methylation at genes linked to hypertension in response to riboflavin supplementation. This is the largest study to date to demonstrate an interaction between DNA methylation of hypertension-related genes and riboflavin supplementation in adults with the MTHFR 677TT genotype. Further work using a genome-wide approach is required to better understand the role of riboflavin in altering DNA methylation in these genetically at-risk individuals.


Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2020

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 48 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 10th June 2020 - 2nd December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-79f79cbf67-fnl7t Total loading time: 1.007 Render date: 2020-12-02T16:08:54.383Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Wed Dec 02 2020 16:06:42 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

DNA methylation of hypertension-related genes is influenced by the MTHFR 677TT genotype and riboflavin supplementation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

DNA methylation of hypertension-related genes is influenced by the MTHFR 677TT genotype and riboflavin supplementation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

DNA methylation of hypertension-related genes is influenced by the MTHFR 677TT genotype and riboflavin supplementation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *