Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Dietary intake of food bioactives in a cohort of European adults with metabolic syndrome enrolled in the Pathway-27 trial
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Dietary intake of food bioactives in a cohort of European adults with metabolic syndrome enrolled in the Pathway-27 trial
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Dietary intake of food bioactives in a cohort of European adults with metabolic syndrome enrolled in the Pathway-27 trial
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is the name given to a cluster of conditions that occur together more often than can be explained by chance. It is estimated that 20–25 % of the global adult population have MetS(1) and are three times as likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke and have a fivefold greater risk of developing type-2 diabetes compared with people who do not have MetS(23).

The PATHWAY-27 project evaluated the effectiveness of bioactive enriched food (BEF) on improving risk factors of MetS in participants at risk, or with, MetS. Following ethical approval, the trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov (trial # NCT02702713). The bioactive compounds selected were docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), oat beta-glucan (OBG) and grape anthocyanins (AC). In a multi-centre, randomized, double-blind, nutritional intervention trial, 251 human volunteers were recruited to consume BEF for 12 weeks. Metabolic and anthropometric markers were measured at 0, 6 and 12 weeks. Dietary exposure to DHA, OBG and AC from the participants’ typical diet was assessed at baseline using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were asked to estimate the frequency of consumption and portion size of foods known to contain each bioactive over 6-weeks prior to the start of the trial. Bioactive composition information was derived from national and international databases (EuroFIR; Polyphenol Explorer), literature information and direct analysis of foods. A deterministic exposure analysis was used to calculate dietary exposure for each participant enrolled in the trial according to equation (1) where E = exposure of individual (j); n = number of portions on day (k) of food commodity (l), w = portion of food, c = concentration of bioactive.

The results (table 1) indicated generally low intakes of DHA, OBG and AC (evidenced by low mean) with great individual variation, and were associated with generally low consumption of fish, wholegrain oat, fruits, vegetables and legumes. Poor diet may contribute to the participants MetS phenotype and justifies interventions to increase bioactive intake. Bioactive exposure will be validated with metabolomics analysis of urine and serum.

(1)$${\bi E}_{\bf j} = \sum \limits_{{\bi l} = 1}^{{\bi n}\lpar {\bi k} \rpar } {\bi w}_{{\bi jkl}}{\bi c}_{{\bi jkl}}$$

Table 1. Bioactive dietary exposure at baseline of participants of the Pathway-27 trial (n = 281).

The PATHWAY-27 project is funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme (Grant agreement number 311876). The authors thank Applications Santé des Lipides Sarl (France), Abro Biotec SL (Spain), Swedish Oat Fiber (Sweden), ADEXGO Kft. (Hungary) and Desarrollos Panaderos Levantinos SLL (Spain) for supplying ingredients and manufacturing bioactive enriched foods.

1.Alberti, KGMM, Eckel, RH, Grundy, SM et al. (2009) Circulation 120(16), 1640–5.
2.Isomaa, B, Almgren, P, Tuomi, T et al. (2001) Diabetes Care 24(4), 683.
3Stern, MP, Williams, K, González-Villalpando, C et al. (2004). Diabetes Care 27(11), 2676.