Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Cross-sectional analyses show no association between fibre intake and faecal butyrate level
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Cross-sectional analyses show no association between fibre intake and faecal butyrate level
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Cross-sectional analyses show no association between fibre intake and faecal butyrate level
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Background: Dietary fibre and the fermentation product butyrate have been implicated in promotion of colonic health. The prevailing paradigm is that dietary fibre consumption leads to increased levels of short-chain fatty acids including butyrate, yielding a potential mechanism of action. This concept has been supported by intervention studies of fibre supplementation; however, the evidence-base from cross-sectional analyses is sparse.

Objective: We aimed to evaluate the strength of support for a linear relationship between fibre intake and faecal butyrate in the absence of a perturbation/intervention. Two studies were undertaken: (i) a cross-sectional analysis of the relationship between habitual fibre intake and faecal butyrate; (ii) a cross-sectional analysis of the relationship between recent (24 hr) fibre intake and faecal butyrate.

Methods: Seventy six subjects were recruited from gastroenterology clinics to a cross-sectional analysis of habitual fibre intake using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Sixteen healthy subjects were recruited to a cross-sectional analysis of recent fibre intake using multiple pass 24 hr recall, sampling was undertaken on 4 occasions, 3 weeks apart. Faecal SCFA were extracted within 3 hr of passing stool and were later analysed by gas chromatography.

Results: When faecal butyrate was compared against habitual fibre intake, no relationship was found (r=0.09, P=0.438 (n=76, all subjects); r=0.092, P=0.597 (n=35, subjects without a pathology). When faecal butyrate was compared against recent fibre intake no relationship was found (r=0.124, P=0.331 – AOAC fibre; r=0.068, P=0.596 – Englyst fibre). When published cross-sectional studies of the fibre-butyrate relationship were reviewed, generally no relationship had been found.

Conclusions: This study suggests that the assumed linear relationship between dietary fibre intake and faecal butyrate does not hold. Both datasets agree with other cross-sectional studies investigating the fibre-butyrate relationship. The hypothesized relationship between fibre intake and faecal butyrate should be re-evaluated.