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Effect of residual stresses on fatigue strength of severely surface deformed steels by shot peening

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2012

Yoshiaki Akiniwa
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
Hidehiko Kimura
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
Takeo Sasaki
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Abstract

The compressive stress distribution below the specimen surface of severely surface deformed steels by shot peening was investigated by using laboratory X-rays and high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source, SPring-8 in the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute. Medium carbon steel plates were heat treated in two different conditions. The Vickers hardness of materials A and B after heat treatment is 408 and 617 HV, respectively. The specimens were shot peened with fine cast iron particles of the size of 50 μm. The coverage was selected to be 5000%. For the synchrotron radiation, by using the monochromatic X-ray beam with several energy levels, the stress values at the arbitrary penetration depth were measured by the constant penetration depth method. The shot-peened specimens were fatigued under four-point bending. The improvement of fatigue strength of material A was not so large because of large surface roughness. On the other hand, for material B, the surface roughness was smaller and the fatigue strength was higher than that of ground specimens.

Type
Applications Of Residual Stress Analysis
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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