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Turning things around? From white fusion stars with Andean flavour to Andean fusion stars with white appeal

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2018


Fiorella Montero-Diaz
Affiliation:
Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, UK E-mail: r.montero.diaz@keele.ac.uk
Corresponding

Abstract

Popular fusion music in Peru's capital Lima has in recent years grown into a representative genre challenging existing segregation of Limeño society through interethnic and interclass interaction. Focusing on three case studies of Peruvian fusionists performing for the white upper classes, this article documents a shift in racialised notions of Andeanness and marginality among the white upper classes from 1960 to 2014, linking the changes in perception to the political and social context of those years. It examines the trajectories of Miki González (an older white fusion star who hires Andean musicians), La Sarita (an intercultural Andean rock band striving to balance the urban and the Andean) and Magaly Solier (a young Andean campesina (‘peasant’) actress and singer who hires white musicians). These case studies demonstrate how fusion music interactions contribute to re-shaping traditional cultural imaginaries, challenge racism, and project images of empowerment onto 21st century Andeans.


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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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