Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Generalization In The Philosophy Of Art

  • J. Kemp (a1)

Extract

If we ask what are the problems which have to be dealt with when the subject of art is being discussed in a philosophical manner, we shall no doubt receive a variety of answers: but there will be in one respect a considerable measure of agreement, viz. that the main problem consists in discovering (a) what is the common property in all works of art which distinguishes them from things that are not works of art, and (b) what is the common property in all good works of art which distinguishes them from bad or mediocre ones. Certainly an immense amount of labour has in the past been devoted to this purpose. Recent philosophical practice, however, has implied some dissatisfaction with this type of approach, and the purpose of this article is to try to show that the dissatisfaction is justified.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Generalization In The Philosophy Of Art
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Generalization In The Philosophy Of Art
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Generalization In The Philosophy Of Art
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All

page 150 note 1 Even this, as it stands, is usually an uninteresting question for the art–historian, who is more likely to learn something valuable from an investigation into specific periods or types of musical composition than from a general inquiry covering the whole field.

page 152 note 1 I say “roughly” deliberately; the conventional belief in a rigid and exhaustive distinction between description, or interpretation, and evaluation is, in my view, mistaken.

page 152 note 2 If we look at the wide variety of aesthetically commendatory words in common use we shall see that the philosopher's concentration on “beautiful” to the neglect of the rest is greatly fostered, even if not wholly caused, by this fondness for pigeon–holing.

Generalization In The Philosophy Of Art

  • J. Kemp (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed