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Trichinella pseudospiralis overcomes innate resistance of the chinese hamster to Trichinella spiralis

  • E. Larsen (a1), G. L. Stewart (a1) and J. Y. Niederkorn (a1)

Extract

Infectivity of Trichinella pseudospiralis in Chinese hamsters was greater than that of Trichinella spiralis. Concurrent infection with these two species of parasite was accompanied by an increase in infectivity of T. spiralis. The infectivity of T. pseudospiralis, but not that of T. spiralis, was significantly influenced by host age. Regardless of host age, T. pseudospiralis was more infective for the Chinese hamster than was T. spiralis. Early during infection, enteritis (myeloperoxidase activity) in hamsters infected with T. pseudospiralis alone was significantly less than that seen in animals infected with T. spiralis alone or with both species concurrently. Myositis in hamsters infected with T. pseudospiralis alone was significantly less on days 14, 17 and 25 post-infection (p.i.) than that observed in concurrently infected or T. spiralis-infected animals. On days 11 and 14 p.i. inflammation in diaphragm muscle from concurrently infected hamsters was significantly less than that seen in animals infected with T. spiralis alone. Muscle histology supported these chemical data on myositis. Suppression of the host inflammatory response against early muscle-stage larvae of T. pseudospiralis underlies the greater infectivity of this parasite for the Chinese hamster.

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Trichinella pseudospiralis overcomes innate resistance of the chinese hamster to Trichinella spiralis

  • E. Larsen (a1), G. L. Stewart (a1) and J. Y. Niederkorn (a1)

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