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Nuttallia meri sp.nov.—a new piroplasm from Psammomys obesus in the lower Jordan Valley

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009


A. E. Gunders
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Ecology Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School Jerusalem, Israel

Extract

A piroplasm was isolated from a wild-caught Psammomys obesus from the lower Jordan Valley. In wild-caught Psammomys the infection is submicroscopic or of very low intensity, but rises sharply following splenectomy. The animal from which the piroplasm was isolated died with a 44 % parasitaemia and haemoglobinuria, following splenectomy.

The piroplasm was transmissible to clean, laboratory-bred Psammomys, to hamsters and Meriones. It was not transmissible to, or gave rise only to transient infections in, adult mice, rats, Mastomys, Acomys and Arvicanthis. Suckling mice and rats showed low parasitaemias for a few days, although division forms of the parasite were observed.

No protective cross-immunity with Nuttallia danii was observed.

On the basis of its measurements, spectrum of infectivity to experimental animals and absence of cross-immunity with N. danii, the piroplasm of Psammomys is considered to be a new species.

The name Nuttallia meri, sp.nov. in memory of the late Prof. Gr. G. Mer, is proposed for this piroplasm of Psammomys obesus.

I should like to express my appreciation of the excellent technical assistance provided by Mrs Miriam Sarfatti and Mr A. Bortinger, and to thank Dr Y. Schlein for his help with some of the drawings. I am particularly indebted to Dr A. Hadani of the Kimron Veterinary Institute for providing me with Meriones and testing N. meri in his laboratory.

This study was supported by the Reubin Kunin and Samuel Lunenfeld Medical Research Foundation - to which grateful acknowledgement is made.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1971

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References

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