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Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in non-outbreak related cases of diarrhoea in human patients in Belgium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2009

T. GEURDEN
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
B. LEVECKE
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium Centre for Research and Conservation, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, Koningin Astridplein 26, B-2018 Antwerp, Belgium
S. M. CACCIÓ
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immunomediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
A. VISSER
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
G. DE GROOTE
Affiliation:
C.R.I. Medical Laboratory, Industriepark Zwijnaarde 3b, B-9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium
S. CASAERT
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
J. VERCRUYSSE
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
E. CLAEREBOUT
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

Stool samples from Belgian patients suffering from abdominal pain and/or diarrhoea were examined for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Cryptosporidium-positive samples were genotyped using the 70 kDa heat shock protein and the 60 kDa glycoprotein (GP60) genes: C. hominis was identified in 54·2% and C. parvum in 45·8% of the samples. Sequencing at the GP60 locus indicated that subgenotype IbA10G2 of C. hominis and subgenotype IIaA15G2R1 of C. parvum were the most prevalent, although several other subgenotypes were identified. For Giardia, sequencing at the β-giardin, triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes revealed assemblage B as the most prevalent (74·4%) in human patients. A high degree of heterogeneity was found, especially on the β-giardin gene, and to a lesser extent on the GDH gene. Furthermore, using a novel species-specific PCR based on the TPI gene, mixed infections with both assemblage A and B were detected in a large number (32·4%) of human patients, which might have important epidemiological implications.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in non-outbreak related cases of diarrhoea in human patients in Belgium
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