Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-z9m8x Total loading time: 0.734 Render date: 2022-09-24T20:01:43.257Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Interactions between Trypanosoma brucei and Babesia spp. and Plasmodium spp. in mice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

Stephanie M. Millott
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS
F. E. G. Cox
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS

Extract

Swiss mice with chronic Trypanosoma brucei infections become refractory to subsequent infection with Babesia microti and B. rodhaini. Infection with B. microti 7 days after T. brucei resulted in an obvious inhibition of the babesia parasitaemias and this inhibition became more profound as the time interval between the infections increased, until at 17–20 days the parasitaemias were totally abolished. Even after intravenous injection of large numbers of parasites parasitaemias were inhibited. Similar inhibition was obtained in BALB/c mice but not in C57BL/6 mice. Mice with established T. brucei infections also showed reduced susceptibility to B. rodhaini. In mice similarly infected with T. brucei and the malaria parasites Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi and P. c. adami the pre-patent periods were noticeably prolonged but the subsequent parasitaemias were unaffected. Infections with P. yoelii were unaffected. Trypanosoma brucei infections were not affected by the intracellular parasites. Among the mechanisms investigated to explain these findings were changes in red blood cell populations, cross-reacting antigens, the release of toxic factors and the generation of activated oxygen species. None of these could account for the inhibition observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Alexander, J. & Phillips, R. S. (1978). Leishmania mexicana an. L. tropica: inhibition of growth in mice by concurrent infections of Trypanosoma brucei. Experimental Parasitology 44, 136–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baltz, T., Baltz, D., Giroud, C. & Pautrizel, R. (1981). Immune depression and macroglobulinemia in experimental sub chronic trypanosomiasis. Infection and Immunity 32, 979–84.Google Scholar
Boreham, P. F. L. (1980). Effects of pharmacologically active substances on the pathogenesis of trypanosomiasis. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 74, 271–2.Google ScholarPubMed
Caristan, A., Vincendeau, P., Desmazes, J. P., Pautrizel, A. N. & Pautrizel, R. (1980). Release of hydrogen peroxide by peritoneal macrophages from mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi. Comptes Rendus de l'académie des Sciences, Paris 290, 243–6.Google Scholar
Clark, I. A. & Hunt, N. H. (1983). Evidence for reactive oxygen intermediates causing hemolysis and parasite death in malaria. Infection and Immunity 39, 16.Google ScholarPubMed
Clark, I. A., Cox, F. E. G. & Allison, A. C. (1977). Protection of mice agains. Babesia spp. and Plasmodium spp. with killed Corynebacterium parvum. Parasitology 74, 918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarkson, M. J. (1976). IgM in Trypanosoma brucei infection of different strains of mice. Parasitology 73, viii.Google Scholar
Cox, F. E. G. (1975). Factors affecting infections of mammals with intraerythrocytic protozoa. Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology 29, 429–51.Google Scholar
Cox, F. E. G. (1976). Increased virulence of trypanosome infections in mice with malaria or piroplasmosis: Immunological considerations. In The Biochemistry of Parasites and Host—Parasite Relationships (ed. van den Bossche, H.), pp. 421–6. Amsterdam: Elsevier/North Holland.Google Scholar
Cox, F. E. G. (1977). Interactions between trypanosomes and piroplasms in mice. Protozoology 3, 129–34.Google Scholar
Cox, F. E. G. (1980). Non-specific immunisation against babesiosis. In Isotope and Radiation Research on Animal Diseases and their Vectors, pp. 95105. Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency.Google Scholar
Cox, F. E. G. & Wedderburn, N. (1972). Enhancement and prolongation o. Babesia microti infections in mice infected with oncogenic viruses. Journal of General Microbiology 72, 7985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dockrell, H. M. & Playfair, J. H. L. (1983). Killing of blood-stage murine malaria parasites by hydrogen peroxide. Infection and Immunity 39, 456–9.Google ScholarPubMed
Herbert, W. J. & Lumsden, W. H. R. (1976). Trypanosoma brucei: a rapid ‘matching’ method for estimating the host's parasitemia. Experimental Parasitology 40, 427–31.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hudson, K. M., Bryner, C., Freeman, J. & Terry, R. J. (1976). Immunodepression, high IgM levels and evasion of the immune response in murine trypanosomiasis. Nature, London 264, 256–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hudson, K. M., Taylor, A. E. R. & Elce, B. J. (1980). Antigenic changes i. Trypanosoma brucei on transmission by tsetse fly. Parasite Immunology 2, 5769.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hudson, K. M. & Terry, R. J. (1979). Immunodepression and the course of infection of a chroni. Trypanosoma brucei infection in mice. Parasite Immunology 1, 317–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ikede, B. O., Lule, M. & Terry, R. J. (1977). Anaemia in trypanosomiasis: mechanisms of erythrocyte destruction in mice infected wit. Trypanosoma congolense or T. brucei. Acta tropica 34, 5360.Google ScholarPubMed
Jack, R. M. & Ward, P. A. (1980). Babesia rodhaini interactions with complement: relationship to parasitic entry into red cells. Journal of Immunology 124, 1566–73.Google ScholarPubMed
Lanham, S. M. (1968). Separation of trypanosomes from the blood of infected rats and mice by anion-exchangers. Nature, London 218, 1273–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McHardy, N. (1972). Protective effect of haemolytic serum on mice infected wit. Babesia rodhaini. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 66, 15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McHardy, N. (1973). Effects of stimulating erythropoiesis in mice infected wit. Babesia rodhaini. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 67, 301–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murray, M., Morrison, W. I. & Whitelaw, D. D. (1982). Host susceptibility to African trypanosomiasis: trypanotolerance. In Advances in Parasitology, vol. 21 (ed. Baker, J. R. and Muller, R.), pp. 268. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Phillips, R. S., Selby, G. R. & Wakelin, D. (1974). The effect o. Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei infections on the immune expulsion of the nematode Trichuris muris from mice. International Journal for Parasitology 4, 409–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Phillips, R. S. & Wakelin, D. (1976). Trichuris muris: effect of concurrent infections with rodent piroplasms on immune expulsion from mice. Experimental Parasitology 39, 95100.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Purvis, A. C. (1977). Immunodepression i. Babesia microti infections. Parasitology 75, 197205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reid, H. W., Buxton, D., Finlayson, J. & Holmes, P. H. (1979). Effect of chroni. Trypanosoma brucei infection on the course of louping-ill virus infection in mice. Infection and Immunity 23, 192–6.Google Scholar
Reid, H. W., Holmes, P. H. & Skinner, H. H. (1979). Immunosuppression in experimental trypanosomiasis: effects o. Trypanosoma brucei on immunisation against louping-ill virus and choriomeningitis. Journal of Comparative Pathology 89, 581–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosenberg, Y. J. & Evans, C. B. (1979). Resistance of mice suppressed for IgM production t. Babesia microti infection. Nature, London 281, 302–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sacks, D. L., Selkirk, M., Ogilvie, B. M. & Askonas, B. A. (1980). Intrinsic immunosuppressive activity of different trypanosome strains varies with parasite virulence. Nature, London. 283, 476–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seed, J. R., Hall, J. E. & Price, C. C. (1983). A physiological mechanism to explain pathogenesis in African trypanosomiasis. Contributions to Microbiology and Immunology 7, 8394.Google ScholarPubMed
Seinen, W., Stegmann, T. & Kuil, H. (1982). Complement does not play a role in promotin. Babesia rodhaini infections in BALB/c mice. Zeitschrift für Parasitenkunde 68, 249–57.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Selkirk, M. E. & Sacks, D. L. (1980). Trypanotolerance in inbred mice —an immunological basis for variation in susceptibility to infection wit. Trypanosoma brucei. Tropenmedizin und Parasitenkunde 31, 435–8.Google Scholar
Taverne, J., Depledge, P. & Playfair, J. H. L. (1982). Differential sensitivit. in vivo of lethal and nonlethal malarial parasites to endotoxin-induced serum factor. Infection and Immunity 37, 927–34.Google Scholar
Terry, R. J. & Hudson, K. M. (1983). Immunodepression in parasitic infections. Fortschritte der Zoologie 27, 125–39.Google Scholar
Tizard, I., Nielsen, K. H., Seed, J. R. & Hall, J. E. (1978). Biologically active products from African trypanosomes. Microbiological Reviews 42, 661–81.Google ScholarPubMed
Urquhart, G. M., Murray, M., Murray, P. K., Jennings, F. W. & Bate, E. (1973). Immunosuppression i. Trypanosoma brucei infections in rats and mice. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 67, 528–35.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vincendeau, P., Caristan, A. & Pautrizel, R. (1981). Macrophage function durin. Trypanosoma musculi infection in mice. Infection and Immunity 34, 378–81.Google Scholar
Voller, A. & O'Neill, P. (1971). Immunofluorescence method suitable for large scale application to malaria. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 45, 524–9.Google ScholarPubMed
Zwart, D. & Brocklesby, D. W. (1979). Babesiosis: non-specific resistance, immunological factors and pathogenesis. In Advances in Parasitology, vol. 17 (ed. Lumsden, W. H. R., Muller, R. and Baker, J. R.) pp. 49113. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
18
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Interactions between Trypanosoma brucei and Babesia spp. and Plasmodium spp. in mice
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Interactions between Trypanosoma brucei and Babesia spp. and Plasmodium spp. in mice
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Interactions between Trypanosoma brucei and Babesia spp. and Plasmodium spp. in mice
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *