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The effect of mosquito transmission of antigenic variants of Plasmodium chabaudi

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009


S. A. McLean
Affiliation:
Wellcome Laboratories for Experimental Parasitology, Glasgow University, Glasgow G61 1QH, Scotland
R. S. Phillips
Affiliation:
Wellcome Laboratories for Experimental Parasitology, Glasgow University, Glasgow G61 1QH, Scotland
C. D. Pearson
Affiliation:
Wellcome Laboratories for Experimental Parasitology, Glasgow University, Glasgow G61 1QH, Scotland
D. Walliker
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Genetics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland

Summary

Plasmodium chabaudi AS strain in mice is characterized by an acute primary parasitaemia, and one or more less acute recrudescences. Previous work has shown, using a passive protection assay, that the recrudescent parasites are usually antigenically different from parasites of the parent population with which the mice were first infected. In this study the effect of mosquito transmission on the antigenic expression of recrudescent populations of P. chabaudi was examined. In the first experiments the recrudescent population which was antigenically different from the parent population was uncloned. After transmission through Anopheles stephensi the recrudescent population appeared to revert to an antigenic type similar to that of the parent population. In the second experiment clones from a recrudescent population were mosquito transmitted and again the parasites of the primary patent parasitaemia in the mice, bitten by the infected mosquitoes, had reverted to the parental type. It is suggested that antigenic variants of P. chabaudi AS strain may revert to a basic type after mosquito transmission.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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References

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