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Editorial

  • K. M. Younger (a1)

Extract

We are all familiar with the dietary guideline exhorting us to eat so many portions of oily fish per week in order to boost our intakes of n-3 long-chain PUFA, but it is perhaps not so widely realised that the fish must themselves be provided with dietary n-3 long-chain PUFA or, possibly, their precursors (though, as in humans, the ability of carnivorous fish to elongate and desaturate n-3 PUFA appears to be limited).

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References

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1Miller, MR, Nichols, PD & Carter, CG (2008) n-3 Oil sources for use in aquaculture – alternatives to the unsustainable harvest of wild fish. Nutr Res Rev 21, 8596.
2McClellan, HL, Miller, SJ & Hartmann, PE (2008) Evolution of lactation: nutrition v. protection with special reference to five mammalian species. Nutr Res Rev 21, 97116.
3Forsythe, LK, Wallace, JMW & Livingstone, MBE (2008) Obesity and inflammation: the effects of weight loss. Nutr Res Rev 21, 117133.
4Gibson, S (2008) Sugar-sweetened soft drinks and obesity: a systematic review of the evidence from observational studies and interventions. Nutr Res Rev 21, 134147.
5van Meijl, LEC, Vrolix, R & Mensink, RP (2008) Dairy product consumption and the metabolic syndrome. Nutr Res Rev 21, 148157.
6Pérez-Jiménez, J & Saura-Calixto, F (2008) Grape products and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Nutr Res Rev 21, 158173.
7Thompson, AK, Shaw, DI, Minihane, AM, et al. . (2008) Trans-fatty acids and cancer: the evidence reviewed. Nutr Res Rev 21, 174188.
8Vossenaar, M, Solomons, NW, Valdéz-Ramos, R, et al. . (2008) Evaluating concordance with the 1997 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research cancer prevention guidelines: challenges for the research community. Nutr Res Rev 21, 189206.
9Roche, JR, Blache, D, Kay, JK, et al. . (2008) Neuroendocrine and physiological regulation of intake with particular reference to domesticated ruminant animals. Nutr Res Rev 21, 207234.

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