Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5bf98f6d76-jhk7w Total loading time: 10.316 Render date: 2021-04-21T06:14:26.710Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Geopolitical Culture, Ethnoschematization and Fantasy: Regarding Seegel's Account of the Mapping of East Central European Lands - Mapping Europe's borderlands: Russian cartography in the age of empire, by Steven Seegel, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2012, 384 pp., $60 (cloth), ISBN 978-0226744254

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2018

Gerard Toal
Affiliation:
School of Public and International Affairs, Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, Alexandria VA 22314, USA toalg@vt.edu
Monika K. Baár
Affiliation:
University of Groningen, m.baar@rug.nl
Steven Seegel
Affiliation:
University of Northern Colorado, History, Campus Box 116, Greeley, CO 80639, steven.seegel@unco.edu
Corresponding

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.
Type
Book Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Association for the Study of Nationalities 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Billé, Franck. 2013. “Territorial Phantom Pains (and other Cartographic Anxieties).” Environment and Planning: Society and Space 31: 000000.Google Scholar
Billig, Michael. 1995. Banal Nationalism. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Broers, Laurence and Toal, Gerard. 2013. “Cartographic Exhibitionism? Visualizing the Territory of Armenia and Nagorny Karabakh.” Problems of Post-Communism 60 (3): 1635.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kabachnik, Peter. 2012. “Wounds that Won't Heal: Cartographic Anxieties and the Quest for Territorial Integrity in Georgia.” Central Asian Survey 31 (1): 4560.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Painter, Joe. 2006. “Cartophilias and Cartoneuroses.” Area 38 (3): 345347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pickles, John. 2004. A History of Spaces: Cartographic Reason, Mapping, and the Geo-coded World. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Toal, Gerard and Dahlman, Carl. 2011. Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and its Reversal. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Toal, Gerard and O'Loughlin, John. 2013. “Land for Peace in Nagorny Karabakh? Political Geographies and Public Attitudes Inside a De Facto State.” Territory, Politics, Governance 1 (2): 158182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bartov, Omer and Weitz, Eric D. 2013. Shatterzone of Empires: Coexistence and Violence in the German, Habsburg, Russian, and Ottoman Borderlands. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Baudrillard, Jean. 2002. Selected Writings, Rev. ed. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Bowman, Isaiah. 1921. “Constantinople and the Balkans.” In What Really Happened at Paris, edited by Edward M. House and Charles Seymour, 140175, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.Google Scholar
Brown, Kate. 2005. A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Case, Holly. 2010. Between States: The Transylvanian Question and the European Idea during World War II. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Magocsi, Paul R., 2002. Historical Atlas of Central Europe: Revised and Expanded Edition. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
Olsson, Gunnar. 2007. Abysmal. A Critique of Cartographic Reason. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snyder, Timothy. 2010. Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Winichakul, Thongchai. 1988 Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-body of a Nation. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 8
Total number of PDF views: 9 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th November 2018 - 21st April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Geopolitical Culture, Ethnoschematization and Fantasy: Regarding Seegel's Account of the Mapping of East Central European Lands - Mapping Europe's borderlands: Russian cartography in the age of empire, by Steven Seegel, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2012, 384 pp., $60 (cloth), ISBN 978-0226744254
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Geopolitical Culture, Ethnoschematization and Fantasy: Regarding Seegel's Account of the Mapping of East Central European Lands - Mapping Europe's borderlands: Russian cartography in the age of empire, by Steven Seegel, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2012, 384 pp., $60 (cloth), ISBN 978-0226744254
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Geopolitical Culture, Ethnoschematization and Fantasy: Regarding Seegel's Account of the Mapping of East Central European Lands - Mapping Europe's borderlands: Russian cartography in the age of empire, by Steven Seegel, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2012, 384 pp., $60 (cloth), ISBN 978-0226744254
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *