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Rapid Migration of Defects in Ion-Implanted Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

J. Lalita
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box E229, S-164 40 Kista-Stockholm, SWEDEN
P. Pellegrino
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box E229, S-164 40 Kista-Stockholm, SWEDEN
A. Hallén
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box E229, S-164 40 Kista-Stockholm, SWEDEN
B. G. Svensson
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box E229, S-164 40 Kista-Stockholm, SWEDEN
N. Keskitalo
Affiliation:
Uppsala University, Department of Electronics, P.O. Box 535, S-751 21 Uppsala, SWEDEN
S. Fatima
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Institute of Advanced Studies, Canberra, ACT 0200, AUSTRALIA
C. Jagadish
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Institute of Advanced Studies, Canberra, ACT 0200, AUSTRALIA
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Abstract

The temperature dependence of the so-called reverse dose rate effect for generation of vacancy-type defects in silicon has been investigated using samples implanted with 1.3 MeV protons at temperatures between 70 and 300 K. The effect is found to involve a thermally controlled process which exhibits an activation energy of ∼0.065 eV, possibly associated with rapid migration of Si self-interstitials (I). Further, using a concept of dual Si ion-implants long range migration of I:s at room temperature has been studied. Annihilation of vacancy-type defects at a depth of ∼3 μm is obtained by injection of I:s from a shallow implant with sufficiently high dose.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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