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Anomalous Diffusion of Ultra low Energy Boron Implants in Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

R. P. Webb
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Surrey, Guilford, Surrey GU2 5XH, UK.
M A Foad
Affiliation:
Applied Materials Implant Division, Foundry Lane, Horsham, W Sussex RH13 5PY, UK
R M Gwilliam
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Surrey, Guilford, Surrey GU2 5XH, UK.
A P Knights
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Surrey, Guilford, Surrey GU2 5XH, UK.
G. Thomas
Affiliation:
SILVACO International, The Surrey Research Park, Guilford, Suney GU2 5YD, UK.
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Abstract

Ultra low energy boron implants (0.2 to 3 keV) have been carried out on Si (100) at doses between 1×1014cm−2 and 1×1015cm−2 using xRLEAP. The samples were annealed at temperatures between 900°C and 1050°C. The atomic profiles of these samples was measured using SIMS. Monte Carlo and diffusion simulations were performed using the SSupreme code. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental measurements show interesting differences these are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

[1] National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, Semiconductor Industry Association, San Jose, Cal 1994.Google Scholar
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