Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        EU offers roadmap to increase access to scientific results
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        EU offers roadmap to increase access to scientific results
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        EU offers roadmap to increase access to scientific results
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Footnotes

openup-h2020.eu

The traditional scientific process has long been ruled by the “publish or perish” mantra. This tradition is now shifting, as more research is being made available to a broader audience as part of the move toward open science.

This shift represents a new way of sharing knowledge using digital technologies and new collaborative tools. It has become a core strategy in Europe as a means to disseminate research to a wider audience—a way to boost innovation and competitiveness.

The EU-funded project OPENUP investigated the challenges facing this changing science landscape. For example, the total number of scholarly publications rose by 23% between 2008 and 2014, according to a report by UNESCO. This increase in output and the demand for more open, transparent, and reproducible science has led to changing requirements for those involved in the research process, such as publishers and funders.

OPENUP examined different aspects of open science, such as peer review for conferences, research data, transferring research to the web, and reaching businesses and the public with research output. The project team launched seven pilot projects to validate their initial findings and test various aspects of the academic review cycle in life sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities, and energy. The pilot projects connected targeted research communities, empowering them to apply and adopt innovative open science approaches.

One of the key goals was to develop policy recommendations: five recommendations with specific actions are now being shared widely to be integrated into decision-making processes.

The recommendations include implementing more projects to test open research impacts, creating incentives to strengthen monitoring of innovative research dissemination, training researchers on alternative research impact measurements, giving more support to implementing new policies, and providing further funding for research into the impact open science has on solving gender and diversity issues.

The project launched the OPENUP hub, a collaborative resource that hosts a catalogue of tools and services. “All the information, methods, and tools are freely available to everyone,” says Project Research Manager Vilius Stanciauskas from the Public Policy and Management Institute in Lithuania.