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Hrabákite, Ni9PbSbS8, a new member of the hauchecornite group from Příbram, Czech Republic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 January 2021

Jiří Sejkora
Affiliation:
Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, National Museum, Cirkusová 1740, Prague 9 - Horní Počernice, 193 00, Czech Republic
Pavel Škácha
Affiliation:
Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, National Museum, Cirkusová 1740, Prague 9 - Horní Počernice, 193 00, Czech Republic Mining Museum Příbram, Hynka Kličky place 293, Příbram VI, 261 01, Czech Republic
Jakub Plášil
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 1999/2, 182 21 Prague 8, Czech Republic
Zdeněk Dolníček
Affiliation:
Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, National Museum, Cirkusová 1740, Prague 9 - Horní Počernice, 193 00, Czech Republic
Jana Ulmanová
Affiliation:
Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, National Museum, Cirkusová 1740, Prague 9 - Horní Počernice, 193 00, Czech Republic
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The new mineral hrabákite (IMA2020-034) was found in siderite–sphalerite gangue with minor dolomite–ankerite at the dump of shaft No. 9, one of the mines in the abandoned Příbram uranium and base-metal district, central Bohemia, Czech Republic. Hrabákite is associated with Pb-rich tučekite, Hg-rich silver, stephanite, nickeline, millerite, gersdorffite, sphalerite and galena. The new mineral occurs as rare prismatic crystals up to 120 μm in size and allotriomorphic grains. Hrabákite is grey with a brownish tint. Mohs hardness is ca. 5–6; the calculated density is 6.37 g.cm–3. In reflected light, hrabákite is grey with a brown hue. Bireflectance is weak and pleochroism was not observed. Anisotropy under crossed polars is very weak (brownish tints) to absent. Internal reflections were not observed. Reflectance values of hrabákite in air (RminRmax, %) are: 39.6–42.5 at 470 nm, 45.0–47.5 at 546 nm, 46.9–49.2 at 589 nm and 48.9–51.2 at 650 nm). The empirical formula for hrabákite, based on electron-microprobe analyses (n = 11), is (Ni8.91Co0.09Fe0.03)9.03(Pb0.94Hg0.04)0.98(Sb0.91As0.08)0.99S7.99. The ideal formula is Ni9PbSbS8, which requires Ni 47.44, Pb 18.60, Sb 10.93 and S 23.03, total of 100.00 wt.%. Hrabákite is tetragonal, P4/mmm, a = 7.3085(4), c = 5.3969(3) Å, with V = 288.27(3) Å3 and Z = 1. The strongest reflections of the calculated powder X-ray diffraction pattern [d, Å (I)(hkl)] are: 3.6543(57)(200); 3.2685(68)(210); 2.7957(100)(211); 2.3920(87)(112); 2.3112(78)(310); 1.8663(74)(222); and 1.8083(71)(302). According to the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (Rint = 0.0218), the unit cell of hrabákite is undoubtedly similar to the cell reported for tučekite. The structure contains four metal cation sites, two Sb (Sb1 dominated by Pb2+) and two Ni (with minor Co2+ content) sites. The close similarity in metrics between hrabákite and tučekite is due to similar bond lengths of Pb–S and Sb–S pairs. Hrabákite is named after Josef Hrabák, the former professor of the Příbram Mining College.

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Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Irina O Galuskina

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