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Why are Phragmites australis Canes Grown in an Udono Reed Bed the Best for Reeds of the Japanese Wind Instrument Hichiriki?: A Structural and Biomechanical Study

  • Masahiro Kawasaki (a1), Tadashi Nobuchi (a2), Masateru Nose (a3) and Makoto Shiojiri (a4)
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      Why are Phragmites australis Canes Grown in an Udono Reed Bed the Best for Reeds of the Japanese Wind Instrument Hichiriki?: A Structural and Biomechanical Study
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      Why are Phragmites australis Canes Grown in an Udono Reed Bed the Best for Reeds of the Japanese Wind Instrument Hichiriki?: A Structural and Biomechanical Study
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Present address: 1-68 Kunobe, Shiga, 520-2353, Japan

#

Present address: 1-297 Wakiyama, Kyoto 618-0091, Japan

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References

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[2] More knowledge about hichiriki is available here: CCRMA, Department of Music, Stanford University, Orchestration in Gagaku Music, “Hichiriki,” https://ccrma.stanford.edu/groups/gagaku/woodwinds/hichiriki.html.
[3] Schuring, M et al., Pipers 381 (2013) 1016.
[4] Backus, J, J Acoust Soc Am 33 (1961) 806809.
[5] Stewart, SE and Strong, WT, J Acoust Soc Am 68 (1980) 109120.
[6] Benade, AH and Kouzoupis, SN, J Acoust Soc Am 83 (1988) 292304.
[7] Gilbert, J et al., J Acoust Soc Am 86 (1989) 3541.
[8] Idogawa, T et al., J Acoust Soc Am 93 (1993) 540551.
[9] Hirschberg, A et al., J Phys 4 (1994) 559568.
[10] Kolesil, P et al., Annals Botany 81 (1998) 151155.
[11] Lawton, CE et al., eds. Recent advances in wood anatomy , Forest Research Institute, Rotarua, New Zealand, 1996) 308315.
[12] Spatz, H-Ch et al., Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 352 (1997) 110.
[13] Kawasaki, M et al., Microsc Res Tech 78 (2015) 260267.
[15] Unpublished work.
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Why are Phragmites australis Canes Grown in an Udono Reed Bed the Best for Reeds of the Japanese Wind Instrument Hichiriki?: A Structural and Biomechanical Study

  • Masahiro Kawasaki (a1), Tadashi Nobuchi (a2), Masateru Nose (a3) and Makoto Shiojiri (a4)

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