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Two new host-specific hepaticolous species of Catinaria (Ramalinaceae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2016

James C. LENDEMER*
Affiliation:
Institute of Systematic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 10458-5126, USA
William R. BUCK
Affiliation:
Institute of Systematic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 10458-5126, USA
Richard C. HARRIS
Affiliation:
Institute of Systematic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 10458-5126, USA

Abstract

Two species of Catinaria with an unusual hepaticolous (i.e. growing on liverworts) lifestyle are described as new to science. Catinaria brodoana is described from species of Cheilolejeunea sect. Leucolejeunea (Lejeuneaceae) growing in south-eastern North America. Catinaria radulae is described from Radula flavifolia (Radulaceae) growing in the Cape Horn Archipelago of southernmost Chile, South America. The species are compared with the type of Catinaria (C. atropurpurea). In addition to occurring on hepatics, C. brodoana is characterized by its cellular exciple, warted ascospores and thallus composed of goniocysts, while C. radulae is characterized by its exciple of radiating hyphae, warted ascospores and absence of a lichenized thallus.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© British Lichen Society, 2016 

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Two new host-specific hepaticolous species of Catinaria (Ramalinaceae)
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