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Acetone washing for the removal of lichen substances affects membrane permeability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 July 2017

Fabio CANDOTTO CARNIEL
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri, 10, I-34127, Trieste, Italy. Email: fcandotto@units.it
Elisa PELLEGRINI
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Agro-ambientali, Università di Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, I-56124, Pisa, Italy
Federica BOVE
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri, 10, I-34127, Trieste, Italy. Email: fcandotto@units.it
Matteo CROSERA
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri, 1, I-34127, Trieste, Italy
Gianpiero ADAMI
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri, 1, I-34127, Trieste, Italy
Cristina NALI
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Agro-ambientali, Università di Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, I-56124, Pisa, Italy
Giacomo LORENZINI
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Agro-ambientali, Università di Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, I-56124, Pisa, Italy
Mauro TRETIACH
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via L. Giorgieri, 10, I-34127, Trieste, Italy. Email: fcandotto@units.it

Abstract

Removing lichen substances from dry lichen thalli using pure acetone is the least detrimental method. Measurements of properties strictly related to the photobiont, such as chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a F), are frequently used to verify acetone toxicity but they cannot reveal possible damage accumulated at the whole thallus level. Here, measurements of Chl a F have been integrated with others concerning the status of cell membranes and photobiont population (potassium leakage, malondialdehyde and photosynthetic pigment content). Dry thalli of Flavoparmelia caperata, Parmotrema perlatum and Xanthoria parietina were subjected to sequential acetone washings according to standard protocols. Membrane permeability was assessed before and after the washing treatment, and after a recovery period of 48 hours. Measurements of Chl a F were taken in a parallel experiment. Acetone washings increased potassium leakage in all the species from 3·9 to 6·6 times greater than the control level. After recovery, only P. perlatum returned to the control level. Chl a F was affected only in F. caperata, with a 20% decrease in F v/F m which had not fully recovered after 48 hours. There was neither an increase in lipid peroxidation of membranes nor a change in the photosynthetic pigment content. The sensitivity of F. caperata to this method and the impact of the results on its future application are discussed.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© British Lichen Society, 2017 

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