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Meier, Reimarus and Kant on Animal Minds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2021

Jacob Browning
Affiliation:
New York University
Corresponding
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Abstract

Close attention to Kant’s comments on animal minds has resulted in radically different readings of key passages in Kant. A major disputed text for understanding Kant on animals is his criticism of G. F. Meier’s view in the 1762 ‘False Subtlety of the Four Syllogistic Figures’. In this article, I argue that Kant’s criticism of Meier should be read as an intervention into an ongoing debate between Meier and H. S. Reimarus on animal minds. Specifically, while broadly aligning himself with Reimarus, Kant distinguishes himself from both Meier and Reimarus on the role of judgement in human consciousness.

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Research Article
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© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Kantian Review

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