Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Neurocognitive and Self-efficacy Benefits of Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Corrigendum
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Neurocognitive and Self-efficacy Benefits of Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Corrigendum
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Neurocognitive and Self-efficacy Benefits of Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Corrigendum
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

In the article by Bryce et al. (2018) incorrect standard deviations were used when calculating the reliable change indices presented in this article. While the correct standard deviation (SD) was used in calculating the Matrics Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) composite reliable change value, an error was made in using cognitive domain SDs from an incorrect domain (i.e., speed SD used for attention domain, etc.) for the domain reliable change values. The article also contains two minor manual entry errors for two participants’ end cognition score.

The authors have rechecked the data and re-run all analyses using the corrected data. The interpretation of the data does not change. This remains correct. The incorrect and correct text are as follows:

Page 549, Abstract, line 8 under Results: “Favoring CR (p = .028)” should read “Favoring CR (p = .027)”

Page 549, Abstract, line 9 under Results: “End-group, 17 (77%)” should read “End-group 13 (59.1%)

Page 554, under Results:

Para 1, line 3: “group x time interaction (p = .028)” should read “group x time interaction (p = .027)”

Para 2, line 2: “both end of group (p = .008)” should read “both end of group (p = .005)”

Para 2, line 5: “3-month follow-up (p = .20)” should read “3-month follow-up (p = .43)”

Page 554, under Results, Rates of Reliable Cognitive Improvement and Effect Size:

Para 1, line 1: “As shown in Table 3, five CR completers (22.73%)” should read “As shown in Table 3, six CR completers (27.27%)”.

Table 3. Comparison of reliable improvements and effect sizes in MCCB domains between CR and CG completers

Note. Reliable improvement based on a reliable change index of + 1.65 (i.e. 90% confidence level).

Percentage improved reported to the nearest whole number.

Reliable change index and Cohen’s d effect size estimated using the per-protocol completer sample (i.e. CR = 22; CG = 20).

CR = Cognitive remediation; CG = computer games; dz = Cohen’s d; MCCB = Matrics Consensus Cognitive Battery; M = mean;

SD = standard deviation.

Para 1, line 6: “moderate effect overall (dz = 0.68)” should read “moderate effect overall (dz = 0.73)”

Para 1, lines 7–9: “Seventeen CR (77.27%) and nine CG (42.86%) completers improved reliably in at least one MCCB cognitive domain” should read “Thirteen CR (59.1%) and six CG (30.0%) completers improved reliably in at least one MCCB cognitive domain”.

Page 555, under Discussion:

Para 2, line 7: “In addition, three-quarters” should read “in addition, approximately 60% (59.1%)”.

Para 2, line 9: “following CR (c.f., ≤ 50% in CG” should read “following CR (c.f., 30% in CG”)

The corrected Tables 2 and 3 are as follows:

Table 2. Results of linear mixed-effect analyses on primary and secondary outcomes among CR and CG completers

Note. N = 43.

* p < .05.

CR = Cognitive remediation; CG = computer games; EUROHIS-QOL = European Health Interview Survey – Quality of Life; ILSS-SR = Independent Living

Skills Survey – Self-Report; MCCB = Matrics Consensus Cognitive Battery; M = mean; PANSS = Positive and Negative Symptom Scale; RSES = Revised

Self-Efficacy Scale; SE = standard error.

REFERENCE

Bryce, S.D., Rossell, S.L., Lee, S.J., Lawrence, R.J., Tan, E.J., Carruthers, S.P., & Ponsford, J.L. (2018). Neurocognitive and self-efficacy benefits of cognitive remediation in schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 24(6), 549562. doi: doi.org/10.1017/S1355617717001369